Archive for the 'Uganda' Category

Uganda Capital Markets Authority joins IOSCO MMoU Appendix A

Capital Markets Authority (CMA) Uganda has taken a big step forward for international links, after changes to Ugandan law. CMA been admitted by global securities standards setter International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) as a signatory to Appendix A of the IOSCO Multilateral Memorandum of Understanding (MMoU).

The MMoU provides an international benchmark for cross-border cooperation and offers securities regulators tools for combating cross-border fraud and misconduct. Uganda’s regulator will have increased access to knowledge and research through the IOSCO network.

The admission follows the recent amendment of Uganda’s CMA Act. The capital market regulator becomes the 112th member to append its signature to the memorandum, which was instituted in 2002.

Keith Kalyegira, the CEO of CMA, said in a press release: “This is a big step for CMA and Uganda in general and I must thank all the stakeholders that have been very instrumental in enabling us to reach this milestone including the CMA Board; our parent ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development; Parliament of Uganda; and the Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs which has tirelessly worked with us to enhance our regulatory framework so that it can fit international standards.

“Our desire going forward is to transform Uganda’s capital market into one of the most efficient, and trusted centres for attracting capital and providing capital in Africa, and this could not easily be achieved without enhancing our regulatory framework to fully suit international standards by ensuring we comply with Appendix A requirements”.

CMA Uganda became a member of the IOSCO Appendix B in 2007 and has since been compliant with most of the international best practices in regulation. However, its participation, engagement and contribution to international dialogues was limited.

The IOSCO MMoU supports mutual cooperation, assistance and consultation among members to ensure compliance with, and enforcement of securities laws and regulations. It is a response to more international activity in securities and derivatives markets.

The formal signing ceremony will be held at the 42nd IOSCO annual conference due in Jamaica in May 2017. CMA first applied to IOSCO to become a signatory to the IOSCO MMoU in September 2007, and was assigned to Appendix B. The capital market regulator proactively started steps over several years towards legislative change to bring Uganda’s legislation into compliance with the MMoU. The reapplication was submitted to the IOSCO General Secretariat in July 2016.

East Africa regulator links

CMA is also a member of the East African Securities Regulatory Authorities (EASRA), which is instrumental in the development of the capital markets industry in East Africa. This includes some joint oversight activities, particularly for financial firms operating in more than one of the East African Community EAC countries. CMA Uganda also does joint inspections with its Kenyan counterpart.

Uganda’s growing capital market

CMA recently concluded its 5-year strategy, and expects to launch a 10-year capital markets development master plan by the end of March. This will map a growth plan for Uganda’s capital market which already includes 2 Ugandan securities exchanges. It will lay a strategy for increasing access to patient capital to finance the growth of commerce and industry in Uganda.

In Uganda, CMA cooperates with other government agencies in the financial sector including Bank of Uganda, the Insurance Regulatory Authority, the Uganda Retirement Benefits Regulatory Authority (URBRA), and the Uganda Registration Services Bureau. The Uganda Registration Services Bureau acts as the Registrar of Companies and implements the Companies Act, 2012 (Companies Act).

It also works with law-enforcement agencies such as the Office of the Attorney General, Director of Public Prosecutions and the Uganda Police. CMA, Bank of Uganda and the Uganda Insurance Commission (now the Insurance Regulatory Authority) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to facilitate cooperation and exchange information in the securities, banking and insurance sectors.

Trading of listed securities is conducted through the Uganda Securities Exchange (USE), established in 1998. There are 16 listed companies on the USE, of which 7 are from privatization of government parastatals. Trading of government bonds on the USE was introduced in 2004.

In July 2015, an automated trading system was introduced on the USE. The clearing and settlement period is 3 days (T+3). A computerized Securities Central Depository System (SCD) was put in place in 2010 following the enactment of the Securities Central Depositories Act (SCD Act) in 2009. The SCD has enabled the USE to automate the clearing and settlement process.

On 4 March 2014, CMA’s Board of Directors considered and approved the application of ALT Xchange East Africa Limited to operate as a stock exchange in Uganda in accordance with the CMA Act.

Kampala view (credit www.enjoyuganda.info)

Meet the new CEO of Uganda Securities Exchange

Paul Bwiso, the former general general manager of stockbroker Dyer and Blair Investment Bank of Uganda, has big plans as new CEO of the Uganda Securities Exchange. His challenges include a challenger exchange, plans to win more listings, more automation, hopes to demutualize the exchange.

Low liquidity in the Ugandan capital market has not deterred a rival exchange, ALTX Uganda, which is currently testing and plans start trading from 1 May. ALTX was founded by Joseph Kitamirike, a previous CEO of the USE. Last month ALTX announced backing from GMEX Group which is offering an “exchange in a box” hosted trading solution and has backing from Deutsche Börse AG and Forum Trading Solutions Limited through its investment vehicle.

Paul Bwiso, the new USE chief executive officer. Photo by Mark Keith Muhumuza

Paul Bwiso, the new USE chief executive officer. Photo by Mark Keith Muhumuza

According to a recent interview in Uganda’s Daily Monitor newspaper, Bwiso, who has been on the exchange’s governing council, says: “My plan is to correct the way we have been doing things… We know the problem with the way things have been done. We shall review some of regulations in order to open up the market.”

He is confident on ALTX: “They were only putting us on the edge but I believe we are in a stronger position.”

He admits the market has struggled to attract listings while Ugandan companies are also seeking to raise money: “We’ll have to sell the potential of the main market segment, growth enterprise market segment and corporate bonds. In about 18 months, if we can fix the system here, then I see about 7 listings,” he said.

Market capitalization on the USE was UGX 28.6 trillion ($9.8 billion) including dual-listed stocks, according to today’s (12 March) market report. A recent news report put the value of 8 local stocks at $1.27bn, dominated by Stanbic Bank Uganda with $600m of market capitalization (measured by number of shares multiplied by closing share price). Power distributor Umeme attracted a lot of interest when it came to the market in November 2012 and since then the share price is up from UGX340 to UGX500 today.

So far only 40,000 Ugandans have registered as shareholders, according to the 2014/15 national budget speech, out of a population of 37.6 million. Liquidity both to invest and to exit have been some of the major worries.

It took the USE governing council more than a year to find the right successor to Kitamirike, according to the report.

Dar es Salaam Africa’s top stock exchange to 31 Jan

Tanzania’s Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange topped the performance list for the 12 months to 31 January for USD investors, according to the data collected by Ryan Hoover’s excellent Investing in Africa website. It managed a 27% climb, including 3.8% in January. That beat the S&P 500 index which managed a strong 11.9%, despite increasing worries of pending bear markets and falling back to 30 Jan, although it has since gained.
Other African bourses which beat the S&P included Uganda Securities Exchange (up 18.3%), South Africa’s JSE (up 17.1%), Nairobi Securities Exchange (16.1%) and Namibian Stock Exchange (up 15%).

Source http://investinginafrica.net

Source http://investinginafrica.net


Hardly surprisingly, two of the worst performers were hit by the crashing oil price, including heavy falls in the currency compared to the soaraway USD. Nigeria was down 36.9% including 16.6% in January and Ghana down 32.1% including 8.3% in January. Weakness in the euro no doubt contributed to the poor performance of the BRVM, as the CFA currency is linked to the euro.

Graphic by www.africanbusinesscentral.com

Graphic by www.africanbusinesscentral.com


This picture, created by website AfricanBusinessCentral gives “volume”, which is normally defined as the number of shares traded, although I could not find the source data for this infographic so we welcome any clarifications. Better indications of exchange liquidity are often the value of shares traded and the number of transactions.

East African securities exchange integration – what’s on in 2015

Securities exchanges in East Africa are working together on the infrastructure for tighter cooperation and links between the capital markets of Rwanda, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and potentially Burundi. The body for cooperation is the East African Securities Exchanges Association (EASEA). The key integration driver is the Technical Working Group (TWG), which has a member from each State. It was established by the East African Community (EAC) to review the best infrastructure and legal framework to facilitate seamless cross-border movement of capital.

Training and qualifications
Also important is the Securities Industry Training Institute (SITI) East Africa, which is improving skills and technical capacity to international standards and creating regional qualifications to enable skilled candidates to work across the region. For 2015 SITI East Africa aims to help more market players and regulators have SITI certification and examinations and is driving training to meet the growing demand for expertise. SITI was set up in 2009 to establish a common curriculum. See this post about the launch of SITI.

Infrastructure
A regional inter-depository transfer mechanism is in place to support movement of cross-listed securities and provide possibilities for investors seeking cross-border trading and investment opportunities. It is part of a capital market infrastructure project progressing under the EAC Financial Sector Development Regional Project (FSDRP I). Each country is leading publicity and workshops to raise awareness and boost cross-border trading.

Backbone – new directives
The TWG is developing Council Directives “which will be the backbone of the proposed integration of the regional capital markets”, according to the communiqué (“EASEA Press Release”) of the last EASEA meeting. The directives under public discussion are:
1. Council Directive of the EAC on Central Securities Depository
2. Council Directive of the EAC on Securities Exchanges
3. Council Directive of the EAC on Self-Regulatory Organizations
4. Council Directive of the EAC on Conduct of Business for Market Intermediaries
5. Council Directive of the EAC on Corporate Governance for Listing Companies.

The TWG has also drafted and completed directives on
1. Council Directive of the EAC on Investor Compensation Schemes
2. Council Directive of the EAC on Financial Education and Consumer Protection
3. Council Directive of the EAC on Disaster Recovery for Capital Market Infrastructure
4. Council Directive of the EAC on Regulated Activities
5. Council Directive of the EAC on Credit-Rating Agencies
6. Council Directive of the EAC on Regulatory Authorities
7. Council Directive of the EAC on Anti-Money Laundering and Combating of Financial Terrorism

The last meeting of EASEA was 26-27 November and Tanzania did not attend. The next is due in Uganda in the Q2 of 2015. EASEA is a member of the Capital Markets Development Committee (CMDC) of the East African Community (EAC) – a committee of the East African Community Secretariat, according to the Uganda Securities Exchange website. The CMDC objectives include

  • Establish cross-listing of stocks, a rating system of listed companies and an index of trading performance to facilitate the negotiation and sale of shares within and external to the Community
  • Ensure unimpeded flow of capital within the Community by facilitating the removal of controls on the transfer of capital among the Partner States
  • Prevent money-laundering activities through the capital markets
  • Ensure that the citizens of and persons resident in a Partner State are allowed to acquire stocks, shares and other securities or to invest in enterprises in the other Partner States

Encourage cross-border trade in financial instruments.

The Africa Report food for thought on the “great game” in East Africa

“East Africa is the most promising regional bloc. [It] has registered between 5 and 6% growth annually for the past decade. We estimate that regional gross domestic product will expand 18-fold by the middle of the century, from $185bn in 2010 to $3.5trn by 2050. This era is comparable to the period immediately after independence.” This is an intriguing article just published by The Africa Report, quoting Gabriel Negatu, regional director of the African Development Bank.
The article, by Parselelo Kantai in Nairobi and Juba, additional reporting by Patrick Smith in Addis Ababa, talks of the four leaders that dominate the East African “chessboard”. Here are a few sample quotes: “At international gatherings such as the African Union summit in Addis Ababa, the four gravitate towards each other: Ethiopia’s Hailemariam Desalegn, Kenya’s Uhuru Kenyatta, Rwanda’s Paul Kagame and Uganda’s Yoweri Museveni.
“Differing in age and political experience, they argue about many details but there is a critical point of consensus. If East Africa is to grasp the economic opportunities now available, there must be a determined effort to integrate its markets and economies, even if that means making concessions and compromises in the short term.
“All four run interventionist foreign policies – Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda sent troops into Somalia, while Rwandan and Ugandan troops have been both invited to and expelled from the Democratic Republic of Congo.
“They all favour a statist hand on the economic tiller, but they are all building up business classes on whose political loyalty they can rely. All have supported Kenyatta in his attempts to avoid prosecution at the International Criminal Court.
“Economic growth and breaking away from dependence on Western markets are common imperatives. None of them enthuse about democracy, particularly in its Western, liberal variants.”
The article also gives insights on Uganda’s $8bn oil infrastructure deal of 5 February that will help reshape the region and its economies and 2 giant railway projects due for completion by 2020. It highlights the need for jobs and services to keep up with growth, and China’s giant role in reshaping the region.
It highlights regional diplomatic tensions too. The writers also point to joint pressure on Tanzania, sometimes seen as the laggard in the regionalization project, and give insightful perspective on the lessons from the South Sudan crisis, as well as letting key South Sudanese voices be heard. They write:
“For governments tempted to ignore the new underclass, South Sudan serves as a cautionary tale. An abiding weakness of governments in East Africa is their ethnocentrism: their tendency to favour crassly their ethnic support bases in the allocation of public sector jobs, appointments, commercial opportunities and government tenders.
“South Sudan’s crisis may have been exacerbated by its weak institutions, but the best illustration of this was the government’s failure to rein in cronyism, corruption and ethnic rivalries in the state sector.
“In South Sudan, these weaknesses caused a war. In other countries in the region, they produce bad elections and policy-making, and hold back burgeoning economies.”
The article speaks of the determination not to be proxies for foreign powers in any conflict and says the South Sudan crisis could give an opportunity to rebuild a state more suited to local realities.
For more, we recommend that you read the article in full here.

Nigeria’s Abuja Commodity Exchange set for privatization

The Nigerian Government is planning to privatize the Abuja Securities and Commodities Exchange (www.abujacomex.com) by mid-2014, according to Arunma Oteh, Director General of Nigeria’s Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). According to an interview on Bloomberg, the aim is to revive trading.
Oteh said: “The Government wants to privatize the only commodity exchange and it had committed to doing it by the end of last year. It didn’t meet that deadline, but it’s planning to do something by the middle of 2014.
“We have a number of both domestic players and international players who are very interested. They’d rather acquire the privatized exchange, so they’re trying to see how far the government is going with this initiative and if not they’re prepared to seek a registration for a new commodity exchange.”
One of the key investors interested is local firm Heirs Holdings Ltd, based in Lagos but with interests across Africa in banking, energy, real estate and agriculture. Chairman Tony Elumelu said in an interview in December the company wants to acquire the Abuja exchange when it is sold or else it will apply to the SEC to set one up.
Heirs Holdings is an investor with Berggruen Holdings and 50 Ventures in African Exchange Holdings Ltd (AFEX www.africaexchange.com). This facilitates an exchange using NASDAQ OMX technology which can be accessed anywhere in the world through the X-Stream electronic trading platform. Other key figures in AFEX include managing partner Jendayi Frazer, who was key in U.S.-Africa policy for nearly 10 years and U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs (2005-2009) and Nicholas Berggruen whose charitable trust funds the investment arm to take “a long-term, patient capital value-oriented approach”.
AFEX has set up the East African Exchange (EAX www.ea-africaexchange.com) in Kigali, with the first node launched in Jan 2013 and the first regional auction – 50 metric tons of maize at $398 per metric ton – between a Ugandan seller and Rwandan buyer in November 2013. Expansion is planned for Kenya and Uganda to build a regional exchange.
AFEX also set up an electronic warehouse receipt system in Nigeria last November, working with the Nigerian Grain Reserve Agency and the Agriculture Ministry. This links farmers and traders as part of the groundwork to set up a commodities exchange, according to Bloomberg.
According to AFEX website: “Warehouse storage is critical complementary infrastructure to any commodity exchange. Properly managed warehouse facilities allow farmers to safely store their harvest without worrying about loss of value until market prices are favorable. An electronic warehouse receipt (e-WR) is issued by the warehouse and represents the stored commodity and is the security instrument that is traded on the exchange. It is only transferable through the electronic system, avoiding issues such as side selling, theft, forgery, etc.
“Berggruen Holdings signed a Memorandum of Understanding establishing a strategic partnership with the East African Community (EAC) Secretariat to support the goals of regional economic and financial integration. With this strategic partnership, AFEX will seek to share its strengths, expertise, experience, technologies, methodologies, and resources in order to advance the goal of regional integration of capital markets.”
“Our vision is to create lasting institutions that will capitalize on Africa’s agricultural potential, support African farmers, achieve food security, provide energy security, and improve Africa’s overall global trade competitiveness.”
Nigeria has a fast-growing population which is already 170 million people. It produced Africa’s third-biggest cocoa harvest in 2013 and produces cotton, sugar and other crops.
The ASCE website says it was originally set up as a stock exchange in 1998 and started electronic trading in 2001 and was converted into a commodity exchange 3 months later and brought under the supervision of the Federal Ministry of Commerce. The website does not appear to have been updated recently.

Top performances for USD investors at Africa’s stock exchanges

Malawi came out as Africa’s top-performing securities exchange for USD-based investors over 2013, with a strong 62.4% return over the year to 31 December. According to data published by the excellent website, www.investinginafrica.net, 8 out of 13 African exchanges surveyed beat the 29.6% return achieved by the key US S&P 500 equity index.
Other top performers for USD investors included West Africa’s regional securities exchange Bourse Régionale des Valeurs Mobilières (BRVM) which covers 8 countries. Ghana Stock Exchange gave 44.8% return, the Nigerian Stock Exchange was close behind with 44.6% and Kenya’s Nairobi Securities Exchange scored 43.7%.
Worst performers were the Namibian Stock Exchange (-2.6%) and the South Africa’s Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) with a return of -9.3%, both strongly affected by the decline in the exchange rate of ZAR currency against USD.
Prospects for African exchanges continue to look good with many African economies expected to continue strong growth in coming years and increasing deal interest. However, changes in quantitative easing in the US could lead to cash withdrawals from emerging and frontier markets including Africa.
Liquidity is a major challenge for many exchanges, according to the data by Ryan Hoover of InvestinginAfrica. Zambia’s Lusaka stock exchange only traded $0.7million of African equities a week, while Malawi and Uganda only achieved $0.8m each and Namibia $1m. Ghana was at $3.5m a week, just behind Abidjan-based BRVM which traded $4.6m, while Mauritius managed $5.7m a week, Botswana $6.2m and the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange $8.5m. Most liquid exchanges in the list (which does not include the Egyptian Exchange) include Nairobi averaging $37.1m a week, Nigeria at $106.8m and the JSE at $3.5 billion of equity trading a week.
Although Hoover lists the Dar es Salaam SE as trading a creditable $10.7m a week, a news report in the Tanzania Daily News say turnover jumped 5 fold to TZS252.3bn ($155.9m) in 2013, up from TZS50.9bn in 2012, which is equivalent to $3m a week. The paper quotes DSE’s CEO Moremi Marwa saying: “The DSE outstanding performance demonstrates the increased activities coupled with education campaigns geared at enhancing awareness that gradually made the market more vibrant”. However, the article notes there was a single transaction for TZS78.5bn ($48.5m) in Tanzania Breweries (TBL) in the third week of December 2013 as 48 deals between the International Finance Corporation and local investors which boosted local ownership and may have influenced the figures.

For the full table, check www.investinginafrica.net here:

Citadel Capital’s Rift Valley Railway opens Uganda-S Sudan trade after 20 years

Rift Valley Railways (RVR) has repaired 500 kilometers of track between Tororo in eastern Uganda and Gulu in the north. This opens north and northwest Uganda to rail services after 20 years of disuse and inefficiency and provides businesses targeting South Sudan and eastern Democratic Republic of Congo with cheaper transport, including for bulk items.
RVR is a “platform company” for Citadel Capital (citadelcapital.com, CCAP.CA on the Egyptian Exchange), which controls investments worth $9.5 billion and is a leading investment company in Africa and Middle East focusing on energy, transport, agrifoods, mining, and cement and able to tackle large and long-term projects. It operates freight rail services in Kenya and Uganda on an exclusive basis with a mandate to operate railway services on 2,352 km of track linking the port of Mombasa with the interiors of Kenya and Uganda, including Kampala.
Uganda’s President, HE Yoweri Museveni, attended the relaunch of the Tororo-Gulu-Packwach link with Citadel Capital Chairman and Founder Ahmed Heikal, TransCentury Director/Chairman RVR Ngugi Kiuna and BOMI Holdings Chairman Charles Mbire, as well as local government officials and key executives from Citadel Capital and RVR.
According to the press release Dr Heikal said: “Rift Valley Railways is the investment that first brought Citadel Capital to East Africa, a region many of us at the firm now view as our second home on this great continent that we share. Intra-regional trade currently accounts for just 9% of Africa’s total commerce, and we believe this new line is an important milestone that will further complement ongoing Ugandan Government initiatives aimed at facilitating trade on the continent.
“RVR is an excellent example of what can be achieved in Uganda and the continent in the future. It is truly a global financing effort — with shareholders like Bomi in Uganda, our partners Transcentury in Kenya, and Citadel Capital from Egypt.” According to the press release, he said that funding comes from OPIC (US Government arm which finances private sector), sovereign and quasi-sovereign wealth funds from the UAE and Norway, the International Finance Corporation, and the German, French and Dutch governments. RVR’s lenders also include the African Development Bank (AfDB), the International Finance Corporation (IFC), KfW Entwicklungsbank (The German Development Bank, KfW), FMO (the Dutch development bank), Kenya’s Equity Bank, the ICF Debt Pool, and the Belgian Investment Company for Developing Countries (BIO). Africa Railways, Citadel Capital’s platform for investment in the African rail transport sector, counts among its equity investors the IFC African, Latin American and Caribbean Fund LP (ALAC, the private equity fund managed by the IFC Asset Management Company LLC); FMO; German development finance institution DEG; FISEA, a vehicle dedicated to investment in Sub-Saharan Africa owned by France’s Agence Française de Développement and managed by its subsidiary PROPARCO; and the International Finance Corporation. Technical partners are global experts from America Latina Logistica in Brazil.
RVR Group Chief Executive Officer, Darlan de David said that RVR will expand in Gulu and eventually transform the town into a logistical hub for its operations in northern Uganda and the surrounding regions.
Citadel Capital Managing Director Karim Sadek noted: “This new service will play a vital role in promoting regional integration and trade by providing access to areas that were once closed to rail transportation. Working with logistics partners and our own logistics subsidiary, East Africa Rail and Handling, we will provide end-to-end transport and delivery solutions for customers in this important part of East Africa.”
The financing of RVR was previously covered on this blog in 2011.

Jacana merges with InReturn Capital, launches $75m private equity fund for SMEs

Entrepreneurs running small and medium-enterprises (SMEs) in West and East Africa stand to benefit from a new $75 million private equity fund. The announcement follows the news on 29 Jan that two long-term partners are merging.
InReturn Capital (www.inreturncapital.com) is a private-equity company based in Nairobi (Kenya) that invests in SMEs across East Africa, and it plans to close a legal merger in the first quarter of 2013 with London (UK)-based Jacana Partners (www.jacanapartners.com), a private equity specialist in SME investments, which has been building capacity in private equity managers in Africa.
The new partnership will offer a significant boost for East African entrepreneurs seeking value-add expertise and growth capital. InReturn was investing in transaction size of $0.5m-$1.3m and the partnership with Jacana will mean increased access to private equity investment, dedicated investment teams on-the-ground coupled with international private equity expertise and larger deal sizes of between $1m-$5m.
InReturn has rebranded as Jacana Partners. The two firms have been working together for 3 years. Jacana’s West African operations (previously Fidelity Capital Partners) rebranded in August 2012. This creates a leading pan-African SME private equity firm with pan-African coverage which will manage the new $75m SME fund expected to close later this year.
Jacana currently operates in 6 markets (Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and Uganda) and intends to move into 2 new countries with the new fund, possibly Ethiopia, Nigeria and/or Francophone West Africa. It is the only pan-African private equity company with a permanent commitment to the SME sector.
Jacana has invested over $20m to date in 20 portfolio companies employing over 1,300 people. In East Africa, 5 investments have been made to date in a stone quarry, an eye care centre, a supplier of tarpaulins to the relief sector, a serviced office provider and a logistics company and several other transactions are contemplated in the next few months.
Professor Njuguna Ndung’u, Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya commented in a Jacana press release: “East Africa is undergoing a period of rapid economic growth largely fuelled by the expansion of our small-to-medium sized enterprises – key generators of job creation and GDP growth. The merger being rolled out today brings scale to the financing of SMEs which will boost their contribution to East Africa’s economic growth. It is my expectation that we shall see more similar initiatives to scale up financing to SMEs that lie at the heart of development blueprints for governments in the region.’’

Passionate about Africa’s entrepreneurs

Getting closer: Ezra Musoke (left) and Anthony Gichini (right) of InReturn Capital flank Simon Merchant CEO of Jacana Partners.


Anthony Gichini, Partner at InReturn Capital said: “The merger of InReturn Capital with Jacana Partners represents a big step forward in private equity investment for SMEs in East Africa. Jacana’s unique model combines international private equity experts with highly-experienced local teams, meaning our entrepreneurs benefit from strategic advice from international business experts as well as dedicated African investment managers on-the-ground who can add-value and provide hands-on management support. This combination is our winning formula which helps us build strong businesses and deliver superior returns.”
Simon Merchant, CEO of Jacana says: “Jacana Partners is a pan-African private equity firm that invests in entrepreneurs, builds successful SMEs and delivers sustainable financial and social returns. We do this because we are passionate about entrepreneurs as the key drivers of job creation and long-term economic development in Africa. Jacana is uniquely structured to overcome the challenges of private equity investing in SMEs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Combining internationally experienced private equity veterans with highly skilled teams on-the-ground, Jacana has the experience, knowledge and resources to structure great deals, grow sustainable businesses and deliver superior returns.
“By merging our African and European operations, we are consolidating our business into a single fund manager, operating under the Jacana brand. As well as investing the remaining capital from our existing funds, the new Jacana will deploy a new $75m SME fund that we are currently in the processing of raising from international investors.
“The new fund will allow us to significantly increase the scale and geographic reach of our operations and will be invested in SMEs in up to 8 countries in East and West Africa. We firmly believe that a unified Jacana operating under the unique Jacana identity is the optimal platform upon which we can fulfill our mission of building the best SME private equity team in Africa, creating sustainable jobs and supporting long-term economic growth.”

Rise of pension giants set to transform investment in Africa

New giants are arising in African investments – the domestic pension funds. In Nigeria the National Pensions Commission (PenCom) estimated registered pensions to be worth US$14bn in June 2011, with asset values up by 8% in three months; Namibia’s Government Institutions Pension Fund alone is worth some $6bn; South Africa’s pension funds grew at a compound annual growth rate of 14.3% in US dollar terms over 10 years to December 2010, including over 28% in 2010 and Tanzania’s pension industry was audited at $2.1bn for 2010, and growing by 25% a year.

The number of pensioners is set to soar, according to United Nations figures, as the number of people over 60 years in Africa will rise from 55m in 2010 to 213m by 2050, compared to 236m Europeans over 60 years old by 2050. Current pension funds cover only 5%-10% of Africans ranging from 3% in Niger but it used to be 80% in North African countries such as Egypt, Libya and Tunisia. Pensions are not available at all in some countries.

Regulatory reforms are driving the growth of African pensions. Recent reformers include Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Uganda. Ghana created a National Pensions Authority with a 2010 act. Reform in Kenya, including investment guidelines and a new regulator, resulted in strong growth and good investment returns. Tanzania passed the Social Security Regulatory Act in 2008. The rising pension industry is likely to boost fund management and equity industries, exits for private equity and even to fill some of the $45bn annual funding gap for infrastructure. For instance, In January 2012, Tanzania’s National Social Security Fund signed an agreement to finance 60% of the $137m cost of building Kigamboni Bridge. South Africa’s $130bn Government Employees Pension Fund is a major investor in the Pan-African Infrastructure Development Fund which raised $625m in 2007 and is targeting $1bn on its second offering.

For more details on Africa’s pension industry, please check my article published in The Africa Report magazine and website, here is the link www.theafricareport.com and for brief profiles of 6 giant African funds, check here.