Archive for the 'Strategy' Category

Do African commodities exchanges achieve the desired results?

The Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) was set up with backing from the Ethiopian Government. In a very readable 2012 paper by the founder and first CEO Eleni Gabre-Madhin outlining the origins, aims and implementation of ECX, she mentions the Government backing in replacing laws so that trade in commodities including coffee (which makes up 35% of Ethiopia’s exports from 2000-2014), has to go through the exchange, and the determined resistance from those who had previously dominated the export trade.

Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (photo from http://africabusinesscommunities.com)

She mentions funding: “Five initial donors — the US Agency for International Development, the Canadian International Development Agency, the World Bank, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, and the United Nations Development Programme — committed US$9.2 million in just two weeks. This figure grew over the years as commitments increased. The World Food Programme and the European Union joined the list, and donor funding eventually reached US$29 million.” Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is mentioned in later articles as a donor.

Since the early days of ECX, payment has been guaranteed the day after purchase and there is a proud record of zero defaults (as on nearly all regulated exchanges worldwide). This is a big change on earlier problems faced by farmers and others with many buyers reneging on contracts. In addition Eleni’s aimed that the exchange should transform agricultural marketing countrywide, and she oversaw the construction of a host of modern regional warehouses and transport.

On the negative side, a news report in January 2017 in local The Reporter newspaper mentions ECX users reporting problems including increasing contraband and quality compromises by bribing the “cuppers” who grade the commodities.

A study by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in May 2017 suggests that with regard to coffee, the ECX had not brought enough transformation: “Before the establishment of the ECX, Ethiopia had a fairly well-functioning coffee auction floor in Addis Ababa… Second, the strict regulations that the ECX has introduced into the country’s coffee market have resulted in higher transaction costs. These costs could potentially cancel out the benefits of some of the ECX’s innovations, such as electronic payment systems. Finally, the Ethiopian coffee sector continues to face some inherent challenges that are not affected by the ECX—namely, weak infrastructure and low productivity”.

In February 2017 The Economist published an article about African commodity exchanges dubbing them “high tech, low impact”. It noted that ECX had not moved beyond spot trading since 2008 and futures contracts to help farmers manage price fluctuations are far behind the 5-year target.

The Economist verdict: “The Government made it viable by mandating that almost all trade in coffee and some other commodities go through the exchange. This might not be possible elsewhere. A monopoly imposed by fiat makes it more like a state marketing board than an exchange, says Thomas Jayne, an economist at Michigan State University.

“Another model might be the Agricultural Commodity Exchange for Africa in Malawi, which was set up privately in 2006 at the request of an association of smallholder farmers. But its volumes remain low. And its concentration on staple foods such as maize and soya leaves it vulnerable to the sort of government interventions that can sink exchanges. Trading in staples tends to be politically sensitive in times of food scarcity.

“Setting up national exchanges may be the wrong approach. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange plans to introduce a regional contract for Zambian white maize later this year. For lucrative export crops like coffee, well-established offshore exchanges may make more sense than starting from scratch at home. Better a functioning exchange somewhere else than a disappointing one on the doorstep.”

South Africa’s securities exchange war goes to court

Court is the next battleground in a contest to transform the securities exchange landscape in South Africa. Newly licensed exchange 4AX, which is not yet operational, has launched a High Court application to set aside both the decisions of the FSB regulator and its Appeals Board to give a licence to new exchange ZAR X, according to Moneyweb .

Last September the Registrar of South Africa’s Financial Services Board (FSB) awarded licences to ZARX (Pty) Ltd (ZAR X) and 4 Africa Exchange (Pty) Ltd (4AX) (see our story here). The JSE and 4AX appealed against ZAR X’s licence, but in February 2017 the FSB Appeals Board dismissed the appeal, saying that ZARX and the FSB had complied fully with the Financial Markets Act 2012 (FMA), and awarding full costs to both ZARX and the FSB (see another Moneyweb article). ZAR X settled its first trade in February 2017, delayed from an initial September launch date. Its first listing was agribusiness Senwes. 4AX is not yet trading.

In February Donna Nemer, JSE Director of Capital Markets, said the JSE will fully respect and abide by the decision: “We are still very committed to the market and the participants in this market, and will cooperate fully in the debate on how we should be evolving going forward,” she said. “We will continue the work we are doing with the regulator and all the market participants, including the new exchanges, to maintain the high quality capital markets for which South Africa is really well known.” The JSE is not joining the new court case which 4AX has launched in the South Gauteng High Court to set aside both the decisions of the FSB Registrar and the FSB Appeals Board.

Also in waiting is exchange A2X, which has a licence application with the FSB. For more background on 4AX see our story.

Why another exchange?
The new bourse ZAR X has 3 listed securities and 9 authorized market participants or brokers, according to its website. It says a number of listings are in the pipeline.
According to Geoff Cook, cofounder and director of ZAR X, writing in Business Day newspaper this month: “Nowhere is radical change more desperately needed in SA than in the capital markets. The model that has dominated for more than 60 years is stagnant, with no broadening of the capital markets. It is also hopelessly skewed against the private investor.”
Volumes had grown of trading over the counter (OTC) in shares in black economic empowerment schemes for big companies such as MTN, Vodacom, Multichoice, Sasol and Imperial. Other OTC schemes were being operated as restricted shareholder platforms such as large agricultural cooperatives Senwes, TWK and KWV, while a few other companies sought liquidity at low cost for a limited spread of shareholders.

Geoff Cook, ZAR X Head Markets and Regulations (credit ZAR X)


ZAR X co-founder and CEO Etienne Nel created a platform called Equity Express for the OTC market. In July 2014 the FSB issued Board Notice #68 which effectively compels the OTC equity trading market to alter methodology and operate through a licensed exchange in terms of the FMA.
ZAR X works with a pre-funded model, so that cash is prepaid (deposited into the system before a trade) and a seller’s shareholding is pre-cleared before concluding a transaction. This means a huge reduction in settlement risk. Securities are held in a segregated depository account at a central securities depository (CSD), as required by the FMA, with a CSD participant facilitating clearing. The trade settles on t+0 or real time.
According to Cook: “Only severe disruption will return the financial markets to any sense of reality and social relevance. That disruption has arrived. Brokers can now execute a R1,000 order profitably through a world-leading T+0 prefunded execution model that does not require settlement risk capital, in which trading and administration applications are provided at minimal cost and where live data is free to all. Safe custody fees are zero and fees are only paid on conclusion of a transaction.
“The equity market is too concentrated and the debt market remains inaccessible and opaque. Despite there being nearly 1,300 collective investment schemes as well as many broker-managed discretionary portfolios, allocations are nearly all aligned to a limited number of old economy securities. Passive investment products such as index trackers simply compound the concentration.”
Cook says that regulation and the funding imbalance towards collective investment schemes means innovative small and medium and medium-sized companies will struggle to raise capital from asset managers. They need direct access to retail investors or bespoke asset managers who can invest smaller amounts. Asset managers are restricted by the size of their portfolios to investing in securities with large market capitalization.
He says the new exchange will mean that listings of companies with market capitalization of around R200m will become more common.
Cook claims that on average less than 0.5% of daily market volume on the JSE is retail-driven with less than 300,000 active retail clients, across all brokers, loaded within the JSE’s broker deal accounting (BDA) system. He says 30% of trading volume comes from brokers who collocated or moved their trading systems physically closer to the JSE trading engine in order to profit by millisecond time advantages. According to its website: “No high frequency trading, derivatives or short selling will be allowed. ZAR X has deliberately structured fees in such a manner that we wish to encourage investing rather than trading and, in so doing, promote savings.”
“Nearly all equity listings om the JSE are now done by way of private placement, which requires a minimum investment of R100,000 per subscriber. Offers to the public are rare as brokers in the conventional system cannot facilitate smaller retail client transactions profitably. With high costs and insufficient order flow brokers focus on providing discretionary managed portfolios, which attract higher fees but have higher financial entry requirements.
“The ‘uninvested’ retail investor is therefore totally excluded from directly participating in the capital market. Their only access is indirectly via a collective investment scheme that, if they did, would further perpetuate the shrinking of our capital market.
“The concentration of order flows to fewer institutional brokers is detrimental to efficient and transparent market pricing. With thin net margins, institutional brokers use their balance sheets to secure revenue flow by engaging in principal trading, high-frequency trading (HFT), and facilitation trading, including dark pools.”

Stokvels – South Africa’s $3.8bn savings pool
Cook claims there is huge potential for retail investors to buy securities: “Stokvels, whose members are active savers and investors, have more than 2m members. The Zion Christian Church has about 4-million contributing members. The potential size of the ’uninvested’ retail market is unknown, but I would suggest it is in excess of R700bn. The market system has ignored it.”
ZAR X also hopes to work with other exchanges “particularly in Africa”.
Stokvels are a big part of life in South Africa, with estimated 810,000 stokvels and 11.5m members, with a stokvel economy worth R49bn ($3.8bn), according to the National Stokvel Association of South Africa. There is even a comedy show called Stokvel on DSTV’s Zambezi Magic.

Stokvel comedy, Zambezi Magic DSTV.

World Exchange Congress 2017: First step – get domestic capital markets right

Here are some key points from the panel on “Alternative exchanges and connecting the African markets: What do you need to know?” at the World Exchange Congress 2017 in Budapest. All are CEOs: Moderator: Hirander Misra, Chairman and CEO, GMEX Group; Thapelo Tsheole, Botswana Stock Exchange; Moremi Marwa, Dar Es Salaam Stock Exchange; Sunil Benimadhu, Stock Exchange of Mauritius.

Q1: How to develop frontier African stock markets? Benimadhu: “We look at what our niche products are, that we do better than others. We list those products on the exchange. Then we think: ‘How we reach out to the world and tell our story?’ We need to make sure trading on our exchange is easy, efficient and meets international standards. Then we can look beyond our borders and ask what does the region need?”

Q2: Should you offer risk mitigation for currencies? Tanzania, Botswana and Mauritius are all open for investors to take their capital out, Mauritius was one of the first African markets to drop exchange control; it was brave as it’s a small economy, but it found the capital flowing in soon became more than the capital flowing out.
Protecting against changes in value of African currencies such as KES and NGN will be very important for attracting foreign investors, for inter-African trade and for trading in derivatives linked to international currencies. Benimadhu – Mauritius (and other markets) are looking at exchange-traded linked products to mitigate currency risk “there is a strong need to come up with a very sophisticated derivatives platform for mitigating currency risk”.

Q3: Inter-African stock-market links? Marwa: “We are harmonizing our trading rules among the 4 markets in the region – Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda – with the help of the World Bank. We are building an infrastructure based in Tanzania combining our automated trading systems (ATS) and central securities depositories (CSDs). In the Southern African Development Community (SADC) we are also making some progress in harmonizing and integrating our markets.
“Investors would rather see us as one big market, instead of small markets. For any issuer, reaching out the whole region will attract wider interest. In Tanzania we are well placed for this and we encourage harmonization and integration.”
Benimadhu “I have seen examples of larger markets and we should learn from that and use their experience. Take the case of Australia and Singapore, they allowed brokers from Singapore to trade in Australia and vice versa to increase order flow. After 10 years they scrapped it, it did not generate expected volumes. Many of the others have also fallen short of expectations. One which is working is Hong Kong-Shanghai but that is for specific reasons, including access to the Chinese market.
“I am a contrarian. I believe linkages make sense, but before doing that it makes sense to grow the domestic market. Open up, attract foreign flows. Don’t spend a lot of time and energy on linkages, but focus first on growing the domestic market. We should follow regional links, but they should not sidetrack us from where we should concentrate, on our own markets”.

London Stock Exchange £24.5bn merger with Deutsche Börse in doubt

Doubt has been cast on the EUR29bn (£24.5bn) merger between London Stock Exchange Group plc and Deutsche Börse AG this week, after the European Commission demanded LSE must sell off its 60% stake in fixed-income trading platform MTS S.p.A. This is a part of LSE’s Italian business and an important clearing house for European government bonds, including Italian government debt.
The LSE says the EC is “unlikely to provide clearance” after it surprised the City and refused to comply with the demand. It said on Sunday that the request was “disproportionate”.
The deal had been announced a year ago as a “merger of equals” to create a mega-exchange capable of taking on the US exchanges. The European Commission could announce its verdict on 4 April.
LSE and Deutsche Börse had previously agreed to sell the French part of LSE’s clearing business, LCH, to satisfy competition concerns. Rival Euronext was the interested bidder. That may not go ahead.
LSE said that selling its stake in MTS would require approval from several European national regulators and hurt its wider Italian business, where MTS is classified as a “systemically important regulated business”. The LSE also owns Borsa Italiana, based in Milan.
In its statement, LSE said: “Taking all relevant factors into account, and acting in the best interests of shareholders, the LSE Board today concluded that it could not commit to the divestment of MTS.”
US exchanges, including Intercontinental Exchange, headquartered in Atlanta, may now start bidding for the LSE Group.
The 2 leading European exchanges had previously tried to merge in 2000 and 2005. In the current deal, Deutsche Börse, which operates Frankfurt Stock Exchange, will have a 54% stake in the enlarged business but the headquarters was forecast to stay in London. There were concerns post UK’s “Brexit” vote to leave the European Union that considerable volumes of clearing, especially securities denominated in euros, would move to Europe.
LSE and Deutsche Börse say the deal is still on, pending the European Commission verdict. Fees so far to City bankers, lawyers and public relations advisers have so far topped £300m, according to calculations on an announcement.
Deutsche Börse also operates the Luxembourg-based clearing house Clearstream and derivatives platform Eurex. It commented: “The parties will await the further assessment by the European commission and currently expect a decision by the European commission on the merger of Deutsche Börse and LSE by the end of March 2017.”

Paternoster Square with London Stock Exchange at right (credit: Wikipedia)

Small African stock exchanges are likely to stay small

The Economist magazine says most African stock exchanges are small and likely to stay that way. It says few smaller, family-owned businesses, are keen to list on African stock exchanges and that liquidity or secondary trading is an “even bigger challenge” with few African exchanges achieving turnover (share value traded) of even 10% of market capitalization (the value of shares listed).

The magazine cites a recent paper by economists from Erasmus University, Rotterdam, and City University, London. They investigate 59 nascent stock exchanges around the world. They find that exchanges which start small, with few listings and low turnover, tend to remain so. The best chance for success comes from strong banks and growing savings, meaning that many African exchanges might need to wait until their economies grow.

Source: The Economist with figures from World Federation of Exchanges

Several African exchanges are big enough to move forward, including Johannesburg Stock Exchange with nearly $1 trn in market capitalization, Nigeria Stock Exchange and Kenya’s Nairobi Securities Exchange. The article also points to the successful regionalization project that is the Bourse Régionale des Valeurs Mobilières (BRVM), headquartered in Côte d’Ivoire and bringing together 8 national markets to create more investors and more listed stocks.

The article was written after the author attended last month’s 2016 African Securities Exchanges Association conference in Rwanda and watching the brokers in scarlet jackets at the trading board of the Rwanda Stock Exchange in Kigali. It says most African exchanges were created in the 1990s to help with the sale or privatization of state-owned enterprises. Many of these have been turned from loss making drains into high profit giants, driving economies, creating jobs and making investors including local institutions richer.

On the Uganda Securities Exchange, 7 out of 8 domestic listings are from privatizations, and many other exchanges tell the same story. Botswana’s national telco was the BSE’s biggest IPO when it came to market successfully this year. Others are forcing companies to list, for instance telecom companies and mining companies are key targets and listing can be forced through respective licensing of other regulations. Tanzania has reportedly ordered 8 telcos, including 3 offshoots of international companies, to float 28% of shares and MTN is likely to list on the Nigerian bourse in a deal with the telecoms regulator.

Meanwhile private equity continues to flourish in Africa. There could be a positive spin-off in terms of private equity funds using stock exchanges as exits to sell on to new funds and through IPOs. The article does not touch on one of the most interesting trends, the rise of African institutional investors and the effect they could have on capital markets development.

For the original Economist article, read here.

BRVM bourse aims for specialist mining shares platform

The integrated regional stock exchange for West Africa is working with the miners’ favourite global exchange for raising capital in order to build a platform for listing mining shares. Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM), based in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, aims to have a dedicated section for mining ready for business by 2018.

BRVM General Manager Edoh Kossi Amenounve told Bloomberg in an interview that the new mining exchange will be open for companies exploring or operating mines in the region. He explained that the BRVM is talking with Canada’s Toronto Stock Exchange (TMX Group) to set up a “technical partnership” between the two bourses and will “take inspiration” from the Canadian mining-exchange model. Discussions may be completed by the end of 2016.

He told Bloomberg: “Mining companies operating in the region only raise funds in foreign currencies.. Some of them have approached us to see how they could raise the resources they need in local currency. Some have even asked us for a dual listing with the Toronto stock exchange, but the regulating framework isn’t compatible at the moment.”

The BRVM links eight West African countries in an innovative exchange, including gold exporters Mali, Burkina Faso and Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), and the world’s fourth-largest uranium producer, Niger. Many want to boost their mining industries: Burkina Faso is developing new gold and manganese mines, while Côte d’Ivoire is diversifying from agriculture, including cocoa, and aims to develop its untapped mining deposits, including gold and iron ore, according to Bloomberg. The BRVM attracts investors partly because the countries are part of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and so use the CFA Franc, which is pegged to the euro.

Amenounve said: “Most of the countries of the region have significant mining deposits… The development of the mining sector has been extremely important in the last few years. We want to support this development..  We need local, African shareholders to invest in the mining sector.”

The bourse currently dominated by banks and telecommunications shares. It is amending its listing regulations to accommodated the new mining platform. Currently listing regulations require two years of certified accounts. The BRVM exchange aims to list mining issuers, including new companies who are raising money for exploration.

Karma heap-leach project in Burkina Faso (photo:True Gold Mining)

Karma heap-leach project in Burkina Faso (photo:True Gold Mining)

Korea Exchange success story with SMEs

This article summarizes a talk by Honghee Shin, Executive Director of Korea Exchange, at the World Exchanges Congress in March 2016, which highlighted the KRX experience and lessons to be learned.
Building an exchange environment for small and medium-size enterprises and hi-tech companies to raise capital on a securities exchange requires strategic coordination and support by many different government agencies. The Korean Exchange (KRX) has grown to be the world’s third biggest stock exchange for listing and trading SMEs by creating a virtuous cycle in each stage of growth generates cash-flows which in turn fuel other stages.

The original Korea Stock Exchange was set up in 1956 and KRX evolved in 2005 to offer comprehensive front-to-end services. It has KSD (depository) as a 70% owned-subsidiary and also owns 76% of >koscom, a technology subsidiary. It offers a full range of products, trading and market data, as well as the central counterparty (CCP) and it is a self-regulatory organization performing its own market surveillance.

In 2015, KRX had 1,961 listed companies, 8th highest in the world, and traded $1,929 billion of securities, achieving the 10th highest level globally, according to World Federation of Exchanges. The main board is called KOSPI market and it has a futures and options market that was rated 12th in the world.

koreaSMEs160719_diagramvirtuouscycle

It has two boards for SMEs:
• KOSDAQ was launched in 1996, and provides funds for well-established SMEs and “technology-savvy” area including information technology (IT), bio technology (BT) and cultural technology (CT).
• KONEX was launched in 2013 exclusively for SMEs and start-up companies to support their early-stage financing and development through the capital market.

The ratio of market capitalization compared to GDP is higher at KOSDAQ in Korea than any other major SME markets in Asia. In global terms it ranks third among world SME markets for market capitalization and daily trading volume and 4th with 1,061 listed companies. Technology has been the main driver of the market – IT, BT and CT companies made up 68% of the market in 2015, up from 63% in 2005. In particular, biotech has grown its share 4 times and forms 17% of the total market.

KONEX had 24 companies in the third quarter of 2013, but increased that 5 times to 128 listed companies by the end of 2015. Market capitalization is up 8x, and daily average trading value is up 4x over the period. It offers a fast-track “ladder system” which 14 companies have scaled to transfer from KONEX to KOSDAQ.

Much of the success of the exchange can be attributed to the coordinated efforts of Government, the exchange and other stakeholders.

koreaSMEs160719_diagramstakeholders

Key supports from Government include:
1. Tax incentives
– Corporate tax exemption for investing in newly-listed shares(within 2 years)
2. De-regulation for M&A
– Between KONEX and unlisted stocks
– Relieving corporate governance structure
– Waiver of obligation on appointment of external director and full-time auditor
3. Eased accounting standard application
– Exemption of K-IFRS accounting standard.

Concessions offered by KRX are:
1. Relaxation of Listing Requirements
– Lightened listing requirements for corporations with 20% of total investment from angel investors and venture capital
2. Modified disclosure obligation
– Reduction of timely-disclosure
– Exemption of quarter and semi-annual reports
– Mitigation of obligation to submit registration of securities
3. Minimum deposit requirement for investors adjusted from $300,000 to $100,000.

The exchange brings together companies from diversified industries, with a convergence of the high-tech companies that are the driving force of the economy. There is a solid investor base, including active retail investors with ample liquidity, and the exchange offers them a new way to find investment opportunities. The KRX itself offers relaxed listing requirements and less disclosure and maintenance costs. Government offers supportive policies towards gradual de-regulation as well as tax incentives and benefits.

The 2 Korean boards, KOSDAQ and KONEX play a critical role in a virtuous circle of growth and investment. Typically venture capital (VC), angel investors and government (through policies as well as funds) invests into start-up companies. These grow to list on KONEX, where professional investors tend to invest in what re now start-up SME companies, and VC investors can take some funds out to re-invest into fresh start-ups. As the company grows further, it can more to KOSDAQ where often non-professional investors may be interested in what have evolved into established SMEs, and the VCs can take more funds to reinvest into the earlier growth stages. The virtuous circle means that each stage adds momentum to the other stages, fuelling further growth – for the diagram see above.

Dar Stock Exchange shares double on first day of listing in hectic trading

Trading has been fast and furious in the shares of Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange PLC, which self-listed at 9am on 12 July. The first day of trading saw the shares listed at TZS 500 each and soaring as high as TZS 1,000 after hitting TZS 800 in the first 20 minutes. They closed at TZS 935. Turnover was 201 deals out of all the 248 deals for the day, according to the DSE daily report and TZS 794.8 million ($363,750) worth of shares were traded (out of TZS 817.9m traded for all counters).
DSE continued scorching up its own trading boards today (13 July), climbing further to TZS 1,100 and then ending at TZS 1,000 in 289 deals (out of 356 total) for a total value traded of TZS 1.1 billion (out of daily traded value of TZS 1.25bn).
Huge interest had already been seen in the initial public offer (IPO) of shares which ran from 16 May and closed on 3 June. Total bids were TZS 35.8 billion ($16.4 million), or 4.8 times the offered amount of TZS 7.5bn ($3.4m). This follows its demutualization in 2015. The Capital Markets and Securities Authority (CMSA) approved that DSE could augment its “green shoe” option from 10% (i.e. TZS 750m) to 35% or TZS 2.6m). That means the DSE raised TZS 10.1m in total.
IPO applications for up to 10,000 shares (TZS 5m) got their application in full, the full 3% allocation was given to staff, and those who applied for more than 10,000 shares received shares pro rata and a refund.
Government is planning pressure to encourage more listings. Speaking at yesterday’s launch, Finance and Planning Minister Philip Mpango said Government would start with encouragement for privatized companies to list, but it could consider a new law and regulations: “If the mutual talks fail, then the Government will push them to offload some of their shares at the DSE” (as reported in Daily News).
Listed companies that were previous privatizations such as Tanzania Breweries, Tanzania Cigarette Company, National Microfinance Bank, CRDB Bank, Simba Cement, Twiga Cement and TOL Gases are among Tanzania’s 15 largest taxpayers and rated as top-quality employers. Mpango said listing would encourage transparency and good corporate governance, making tax administration easier while enabling citizens to participate in economic activities.

Minister of Finance and Planning Philip Mpango (source rai.co.tz)

Minister of Finance and Planning Philip Mpango (source rai.co.tz)


DSE CEO Moremi Marwa said more than 400 state-owned enterprises (SOEs) had been privatised in the last 20 years, but only 7 listed on the bourse: “It is advisable that future privatizations are conducted through the capital market.”
Nasama Massinda, CEO of CMSA, said they were very pleased by Government’s move to force telecom companies to list 25% of shares at the DSE. “We believe this is the right thing as we want Tanzanians to own shares of these companies… the trend is that some of the firms are allocating shares to one or two ‘mwananchi’. We want them to sell their shares to the public. And the good thing is that these shares are not given for free since local investors would buy them.” She added that the Mining Act also requires that mining firms with special mining licences should sell part of their shares to citizens through DSE.

Investors who want to buy or sell shares can contact the DSE stockbrokers (licensed dealing members) or trade on the DSE’s mobile phone trading platform by dialling *150*36# and selecting “DSE Shares” from the list.

daressalaamse_new logoJan2016

Building African Financial Markets seminar

The 5th Building African Financial Markets (BAFM) capacity-building seminar is coming to the Nigerian Stock Exchange Event Centre in Lagos on 28-29 April. This is the top seminar for professionals and strategic leaders from capital markets all over the continent, including securities exchanges, clearing and settlement, stockbrokers, investors, government officials and any organisations which are part of capital markets system. It is organized by the NSE and the African Securities Exchanges Association.

The seminar includes a market closing/opening ceremony and focused learning interactive sessions on key topics around driving liquidity in African capital markets. Topics are very relevant, including securities lending, strengthening equity market structures, derivatives and CCP, optimal price mechanism, global reporting standards, information security, and capital markets integration.

Its suitable for seniors from capital and financial markets in product development, regulation and policy, information technology, investor relations, trading, clearing and settlement.

BAFM-III (1)

  • Role of securities lending in boosting liquidity in African capital markets
  • Strengthening equity market structures in Africa to better address low liquidity
  • Instituting an optimal price mechanism on African stock exchanges
  • Capital market integration – a catalyst for boosting liquidity on African stock exchanges
  • Liquidity enabling regulation
  • Role and importance of CCP in a derivatives market
  • Trading derivatives products – how the products work?
  • Rules governing CCP
  • Adhering to best global reporting standards
  • Information security – protecting your market’s digital assets.

According to the organizers: “As African economies reposition themselves following the significant impact of global headwinds that have challenged the continent’s growth prospects, African capital markets are instrumental in financing the continent’s infrastructure and capital requirements.”

Cost is NGN70,000 plus VAT/$350. For more go to NSE website.

Exchange trends from World Exchange Congress 2016

A couple of interesting statements from speakers at the excellent World Exchange Congress 2016, happening 22-23 March at Bishopsgate in London.

Exchanges – back to the information coffee house
Stu Taylor, CEO of Algomi: Fixed-income trading was dominated by banks who use voice trading and support it with their balance sheets. Most banks and their clients prefer this way and are not naturally going to switch to putting limit orders through the exchanges. We try to see how we can help with parts of the transactions, we worked first with the regulated Swiss exchange to put technology components at banks and that can help them sometimes with their trades, the exchange can help them find different counterparts, or with missed trades or, when they are struggling to complete a deal, the exchange can make suggestions. We suggest actions into the existing workflow, rather than trying to change the workflow. Exchanges can connect information sources so the exchange is the place to see what’s going, it can offer “bond dating”, trying to match buyers and sellers into a transaction.

Historically the technology focus for exchanges has been on execution, but now the innovation is that the exchange is about the information itself. Technology is shrinking the world, we used to talk about 6 degrees of separation in the world. Technology such as Facebook has made that number closer to 3 degrees of separation. Exchanges are back to the origins of exchanges as the coffee shops, finding a place to know someone who knows someone. Information and pre-trade are where the next waves of innovation for exchanges are going to come from.

Exchanges role in banks' bilateral bond trading, source www.algomi.com

Exchanges role in banks’ bilateral bond trading, source www.algomi.com

Can technology create liquidity?
Ganesh Iyer, Director of Global Product Marketing at IPC Systems: “Technology has become a facilitator of liquidity. Uber has no taxis but it provides taxi “liquidity”, Airbnb has no rooms but provides accommodation “liquidity”. Technology does not create liquidity on its own but it brings together market participants and that leads to liquidity. In the capital markets it can bring very diverse market participants together, for instance a mutual fund seller with a diverse “buy-side” community including hedge funds, retail, etc.

Move over-the-counter (OTC) trading onto exchanges
April Day, Director, Equities, Association for Financial Markets in Europe: “There is always a need for keep some balance, some trades are not suitable for exchange trading, there is still a time when investors choose to trade off exchange for reasons such as not wanting to share market information, reduce costs, less disclosure, etc.

Sergio Ricardo Liporace Gullo, Chief Representative EMEA BM&FBOVESPA; The Brazil market has reached a big harmony, we have survived many crises and we have a sophisticated system offered by the exchange which offers central clearing and makes all parties’ lives more efficient and offers better use of capital.

Keisuke Arai, Chief Representative in Europe of Japan Exchange Group: The Japaese experience is that it’s important for the exchange to strike the right balance between market efficiency and investor protection.