Archive for the 'Stock Exchanges' Category

Vodacom Tanzania’s $213m IPO results due 7 August

According to the latest timetable on the website of Vodacom Tanzania, the extended $213 million initial public offer (IPO) of shares closed on 28 July. Shares are due to be allotted, the register delivered to the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) and the offer results announced on Monday, 7 August.

Refunds and CSD receipts will be printed on 14 August and the listing and trading of shares will be on 15 August. The offer had been extended previously, see our June story here , most recently from 10 July.

A total of 560m shares had been offered at TZS850 each, for an offer value of TZS476bn. It is the biggest IPO so far in 2017 on African capital markets.

The IPO follows the Electronic and Postal Communications Act of 2010 (EPOCA) which requires all telecom companies to list, and the June 2016 Finance Act requiring them to list at least 25% on the DSE to boost domestic ownership. According to news reports the law was changed in June (Finance Act 2017) to allow foreigners to participate.

According to a Business Report article, Vodacom spokesperson Byron Kennedy said in July that opening to international investors: “.. is a positive move for the more than 40,000 Tanzanians that have invested in the IPO as it is expected to improve liquidity of the Vodacom Tanzania shares once they are listed.”

Vivek Mathur, the chief operating officer for Vodacom’s international business, said in a prospectus in February that the capital raising and listing were in line with the government’s intention to strengthen the country’s telecommunications sector to play a key role as the engine of economic growth and socio-economic development: “This process also aims to widen financial inclusion among Tanzanians, and to economically empower the people of Tanzania.”

Reuters reports that two other major telecoms operators, Millicom’s subsidiary Tigo and the local business of India’s Bharti Airtel, have also submitted prospectuses to the regulator the Capital Markets Supervisory Authority CMSA and are awaiting approval for their IPOs.

Nigerian Stock Exchange’s new Nasdaq market surveillance

The Nigerian Stock Exchange has gone live with a new market-surveillance platform powered by SMARTS, a solution supplied by Nasdaq.

Tinuade Awe, General Counsel and Head of Regulation, NSE, said in an NSE press release: “As we enter the growth phase of the development of our market, including the introduction of new asset classes such as derivatives, there will be the imperative of processing significant volumes of market information in real-time to detect anomalies. The SMARTS technology, which we have successfully deployed, allows our team to proactively analyze patterns and trends to make sense of the vast amounts of data for investigative purposes and protection of investors, while strengthening the integrity of our market.”

The technology lets the Nigerian bourse proactively monitor market manipulation (including spoofing and layering), detect and deter manipulative tendencies, gather intelligence, carry out monitoring and analysis of traders, conduct multi-asset and cross-market surveillance, and execute risk-based supervision of flagged participants. The new system went live in July.

According to Nasdaq, the SMARTS Surveillance solutions are used at 47 marketplaces, 17 regulators and 140+ market participants across 65 countries and are used by over 3,500 compliance professionals. They have been used for real-time, cross-market, cross-asset surveillance for over 22 years.

Tony Sio, Head of Exchange & Regulator Surveillance, Market Technology at Nasdaq, said: “SMARTS performs universal surveillance of all asset classes and provides a strong platform for NSE to develop new products such as derivatives. We look forward to a long partnership with the NSE as the Nigerian markets evolve.”

CEO Oscar Onyema shows top managers of Nasdaq the NSE trading floor a few years ago. (Credit: businessdayonline)

South Africa’s securities exchange war goes to court

Court is the next battleground in a contest to transform the securities exchange landscape in South Africa. Newly licensed exchange 4AX, which is not yet operational, has launched a High Court application to set aside both the decisions of the FSB regulator and its Appeals Board to give a licence to new exchange ZAR X, according to Moneyweb .

Last September the Registrar of South Africa’s Financial Services Board (FSB) awarded licences to ZARX (Pty) Ltd (ZAR X) and 4 Africa Exchange (Pty) Ltd (4AX) (see our story here). The JSE and 4AX appealed against ZAR X’s licence, but in February 2017 the FSB Appeals Board dismissed the appeal, saying that ZARX and the FSB had complied fully with the Financial Markets Act 2012 (FMA), and awarding full costs to both ZARX and the FSB (see another Moneyweb article). ZAR X settled its first trade in February 2017, delayed from an initial September launch date. Its first listing was agribusiness Senwes. 4AX is not yet trading.

In February Donna Nemer, JSE Director of Capital Markets, said the JSE will fully respect and abide by the decision: “We are still very committed to the market and the participants in this market, and will cooperate fully in the debate on how we should be evolving going forward,” she said. “We will continue the work we are doing with the regulator and all the market participants, including the new exchanges, to maintain the high quality capital markets for which South Africa is really well known.” The JSE is not joining the new court case which 4AX has launched in the South Gauteng High Court to set aside both the decisions of the FSB Registrar and the FSB Appeals Board.

Also in waiting is exchange A2X, which has a licence application with the FSB. For more background on 4AX see our story.

Why another exchange?
The new bourse ZAR X has 3 listed securities and 9 authorized market participants or brokers, according to its website. It says a number of listings are in the pipeline.
According to Geoff Cook, cofounder and director of ZAR X, writing in Business Day newspaper this month: “Nowhere is radical change more desperately needed in SA than in the capital markets. The model that has dominated for more than 60 years is stagnant, with no broadening of the capital markets. It is also hopelessly skewed against the private investor.”
Volumes had grown of trading over the counter (OTC) in shares in black economic empowerment schemes for big companies such as MTN, Vodacom, Multichoice, Sasol and Imperial. Other OTC schemes were being operated as restricted shareholder platforms such as large agricultural cooperatives Senwes, TWK and KWV, while a few other companies sought liquidity at low cost for a limited spread of shareholders.

Geoff Cook, ZAR X Head Markets and Regulations (credit ZAR X)


ZAR X co-founder and CEO Etienne Nel created a platform called Equity Express for the OTC market. In July 2014 the FSB issued Board Notice #68 which effectively compels the OTC equity trading market to alter methodology and operate through a licensed exchange in terms of the FMA.
ZAR X works with a pre-funded model, so that cash is prepaid (deposited into the system before a trade) and a seller’s shareholding is pre-cleared before concluding a transaction. This means a huge reduction in settlement risk. Securities are held in a segregated depository account at a central securities depository (CSD), as required by the FMA, with a CSD participant facilitating clearing. The trade settles on t+0 or real time.
According to Cook: “Only severe disruption will return the financial markets to any sense of reality and social relevance. That disruption has arrived. Brokers can now execute a R1,000 order profitably through a world-leading T+0 prefunded execution model that does not require settlement risk capital, in which trading and administration applications are provided at minimal cost and where live data is free to all. Safe custody fees are zero and fees are only paid on conclusion of a transaction.
“The equity market is too concentrated and the debt market remains inaccessible and opaque. Despite there being nearly 1,300 collective investment schemes as well as many broker-managed discretionary portfolios, allocations are nearly all aligned to a limited number of old economy securities. Passive investment products such as index trackers simply compound the concentration.”
Cook says that regulation and the funding imbalance towards collective investment schemes means innovative small and medium and medium-sized companies will struggle to raise capital from asset managers. They need direct access to retail investors or bespoke asset managers who can invest smaller amounts. Asset managers are restricted by the size of their portfolios to investing in securities with large market capitalization.
He says the new exchange will mean that listings of companies with market capitalization of around R200m will become more common.
Cook claims that on average less than 0.5% of daily market volume on the JSE is retail-driven with less than 300,000 active retail clients, across all brokers, loaded within the JSE’s broker deal accounting (BDA) system. He says 30% of trading volume comes from brokers who collocated or moved their trading systems physically closer to the JSE trading engine in order to profit by millisecond time advantages. According to its website: “No high frequency trading, derivatives or short selling will be allowed. ZAR X has deliberately structured fees in such a manner that we wish to encourage investing rather than trading and, in so doing, promote savings.”
“Nearly all equity listings om the JSE are now done by way of private placement, which requires a minimum investment of R100,000 per subscriber. Offers to the public are rare as brokers in the conventional system cannot facilitate smaller retail client transactions profitably. With high costs and insufficient order flow brokers focus on providing discretionary managed portfolios, which attract higher fees but have higher financial entry requirements.
“The ‘uninvested’ retail investor is therefore totally excluded from directly participating in the capital market. Their only access is indirectly via a collective investment scheme that, if they did, would further perpetuate the shrinking of our capital market.
“The concentration of order flows to fewer institutional brokers is detrimental to efficient and transparent market pricing. With thin net margins, institutional brokers use their balance sheets to secure revenue flow by engaging in principal trading, high-frequency trading (HFT), and facilitation trading, including dark pools.”

Stokvels – South Africa’s $3.8bn savings pool
Cook claims there is huge potential for retail investors to buy securities: “Stokvels, whose members are active savers and investors, have more than 2m members. The Zion Christian Church has about 4-million contributing members. The potential size of the ’uninvested’ retail market is unknown, but I would suggest it is in excess of R700bn. The market system has ignored it.”
ZAR X also hopes to work with other exchanges “particularly in Africa”.
Stokvels are a big part of life in South Africa, with estimated 810,000 stokvels and 11.5m members, with a stokvel economy worth R49bn ($3.8bn), according to the National Stokvel Association of South Africa. There is even a comedy show called Stokvel on DSTV’s Zambezi Magic.

Stokvel comedy, Zambezi Magic DSTV.

Namibian SX and Bank of Namibia poised to launch paperless

The Namibian Stock Exchange and the central Bank of Namibia are working together to create a central securities depository (CSD) for equities, bonds and bills traded. They are waiting for laws and regulations to be passed to get the new system operational.

According to Kazembire Zemburuka, Deputy Director: Corporate Communications at the Bank of Namibia, quoted in a Southern Times newspaper article: “In an effort to develop the domestic capital market, the Bank of Namibia and the Namibian Stock Exchange have collaborated to jointly create a Central Security Depository company that will be licensed by NAMFISA (regulator) to hold and safeguard financial instruments in electronic format.”.

He said the Central Security Depository (CSD) Company is already in existence and has a Board of Directors comprising representatives from the two institutions. Following industry-wide consultations, systems requirements for the Namibian CSD were developed and a vendor has been appointed to provide a system. It will cater for both equities and bonds.

“Full implementation of the system awaits the finalisation of the necessary legislation and regulations. This process is already at an advanced stage,” explained Zemburuka. The company will provide electronic settlement of equities and bonds transactions concluded on the NSX and settle transactions in money market securities. It will be regulated by the Namibian Financial Institutions Supervisory Authority (NAMFISA).

Earlier, Tiaan Bazuin the NSX CEO told Namibian Economist newspaper why the 2 institutions are working together: “It is not a requirement to work jointly, it is preferred as it is a national project, in fact we have a market steering committee with all the market participants involved, including the banks, asset managers [amongst others].”

Interested stakeholders would be able to join as shareholders in future. “We have already indicated once it is up and running, others will also be able to join as shareholders if they want to. Typically some market participants wish to have a strategic stake in financial market infrastructure.”

In many African countries there are often two CSDs, with the central bank and the exchange each running their own systems, but it is much more efficient and reduces risk if both are integrated and built to work seamlessly with the capital markets trading such as the securities exchanges. Bank of Namibia and the local banks have worked together over decades and built advanced payment systems between the banks. Similar systems extending across most other countries in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and it is hoped eventually that crossborder securities trading will also become more widespread.

Since the NSX was founded, it has operated using physical or paper certificates representing ownership of equities and bonds. It set up a very streamlined system for this, settling domestic equities on T+5 and South African stocks on T+3, and working closely with the banks involved in including global custodians.

Only treasury bills are paperless. Dual-listed South African and other shares are settled on the home country central securities depository, for example Strate in South Africa.

Latest on developments in African capital markets

Presentations from the exciting Building African Financial Markets (BAFM) seminar are now available on the Internet. The 6th edition of BAFM was hosted the first time in North Africa by the Casablanca Stock Exchange (CSE) in Morocco on 18-19 May, 2017. The seminars are organized with the African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA).

The theme of the event was “Global Best Practices to Enhance the African Capital Markets”, I was compere and there were many top presentations which you can download here. It provided a great platform for sharing information and discussing best ways the exchanges can support Africa’s needs for long-term capital.

According to the host, Karim Hajji, Deputy President of ASEA and CEO of the Casablanca Bourse: “The Casablanca Stock Exchange is more than ever before convinced of the important role of African exchanges in mobilizing the means for financing the continent’s growth. BAFM is indeed an opportunity to consider new paths of cooperation and enhance synergies so as to improve the role of Exchanges in financing the African economy.”

BAFM is a capacity-building initiative designed to promote growth in African financial markets. The Casablanca meeting attracted more than 100 delegates from within and outside Africa. There were very many top speakers including: Abimbola Ogunbanjo (First Vice President of the Nigerian Stock Exchange), Ronald Webb (Director – Financial Services, Safaricom Ltd), Riccardo Ambrosini, (Climate Finance Specialist, IFC World Bank Group) and Selloua Chakri (Head of Market Structure Strategy MEA Region, Bloomberg L.P.).
This high-level meeting provided a.

Oscar N. Onyema, President of ASEA and CEO of the Nigerian Stock Exchange, said; “Building the African financial market is our collective responsibility, hence we must seek out knowledge that empowers each of us to remove impediments to the advancement of our market.”

To view the presentations as well as the pictures of the Seminar, please visit http://www.african-exchanges.org/sites/default/files/publications/building_african_financial_markets.pdf and http://www.african-exchanges.org/en/media#contentCarousel/gallery respectively.

Progress of real-estate investment trusts (REITs) in financing Africa

“There are only 32 REITs (real-estate investment trusts) in Africa with South Africa being the largest REIT market having 27 REITs and Nigeria second with 3 REITs listed”, according to Oscar Onyema, CEO of the Nigerian Stock Exchange. He said REITs are only available in 4 countries – Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya – and their total value was $29 billion. (TM NOTE: Mauritius and some other markets also list real-estate investment companies under general or other listing regulations, without specific rules for REITs).

Onyema said that the volume of transactions had climbed from $65 million across Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana in 2012 to an estimated $265m worth of transactions in 2015. “This indicates an increasing market as a larger number of investors are beginning to take increased interest and participation in the Real Estate Investment sector.

“Whilst the Nigerian market may not be as developed as other emerging markets such as Mexico, South Africa and Singapore, this asset class has definitely come to stay. Today we have about N40bn ($126.8m) in REITs market cap (capitalization) listed on the NSE and a total of N96b in the construction/ real estate sector of our equity market”.

Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Raji Fashola (who was represented by Ayo Gbeleyi, Managing Partner of GA Capital Limited) said Government would use the stock exchange among other tools to raise finance for housing: “It is difficult, if not impossible, for Government to provide all housing solutions given the diverse demands. Best practices in places like the UK, US, Canada and Singapore are stories of a mixture of ownership and rental arrangements.

”In the medium term, we intend to raise more capital outside direct Government Treasury, working with the Federal Ministry of Finance, through Infrastructure bonds, REITS and other forms of real-estate financing instruments, leveraging as most appropriate the platform of the Nigerian Stock Exchange”. Other funding sources include pension funds, private equity funds and the National Housing Fund managed by the Federal Mortgage Bank.

Onyema said the exchange is implementing changes in the reporting and valuation of REITs and other collective investment schemes listed on the NSE, in order “to create a more transparent, liquid and accessible market structure in line with global best practices for REITs”.

Abimbola Ogunbanjo, the first Vice President of the National Council of NSE, said the Nigerian REITs market is largely underdeveloped due to lack of clarity on regulatory issues: “The major challenges facing the REITs industry in Nigeria include restrictive legislation, poor knowledge and understanding of the industry in addition to prolonged bottlenecks created by the Land Use Act of 1978. Nigeria’s Land Use Act is embedded in the Constitution of our country. Thus, any attempt to rectify its inadequacies requires a constitutional amendment which of itself is a major challenge”

The speakers were at a recent conference at the Nigerian bourse to promote real estate investment trusts (REITs in Africa). It was sponsored by Stanbic IBTC Holdings Plc, FSDH Asset Management Limited, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), United Property Development Company (UPDC) Plc, Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) Nigeria Limited, Udo Udoma & Belo-Osagie and Mixta Nigeria. Click for NSE press release and photos.

RETS conference: Photo Nigerian Stock Exchange.

Top speakers for BAFM capacity-building seminar 18-19 May


Leaders and movers of African capital markets are heading to Casablanca for the 6th Building African Financial Markets (BAFM) capacity-building seminar on 18-19 May, organized by Casablanca Stock Exchange with the African Securities Exchanges Association and supported by member exchanges.
This year focuses on “Global best practices to enhance African capital markets”. The agenda features CEOs of top African exchanges and other industry leaders: Oscar Onyema CEO of Nigerian Stock Exchange and President of ASEA, Siobhan Cleary of the World Federation of Exchanges, Karim Hajji CEO of Casablanca Stock Exchange, and speakers from Bloomberg, International Finance Corporation, Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, Tanzania Capital Markets and Securities Authority, Securities and Exchange Commission (Nigeria), Safaricom, Kenya Retirement Benefits Authority, Maroclear, and many others.
Topics include: demutualization and growth, what the new US administration means for African markets, financial inclusion, pensions, liquidity, green finance, global principles on IT infrastructure, and regional integration of exchanges in East, West and Southern Africa.
It will be held at Casablanca Most Events Business Center, Anfa Place, Casablanca, Morocco. Don’t miss a great chance to meet the drivers of Africa’s capital markets development. For more, check the Casablanca Stock Exchange website page.

JSE listed ETF offers 15 African exchanges ex-South Africa

A new exchange-traded fund (ETF) offers investors access to an index covering 50 companies across Africa outside South Africa. The AMI Big50 Ex-SA ETF tracks a new index designed by Cloud Atlas Investing, a Johannesburg-based collective investment scheme. It covers shares in 15 African exchanges including Egypt, Mauritius, Kenya, Morocco, Tanzania, Nigeria, Tunisia, Botswana, Namibia, Uganda, Ghana and Zimbabwe, as well as the BRVM Exchange in West Africa.

The ETF was listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange on 20 April. Donna Nemer, Director of Capital Markets at the JS, said in a press release: “The JSE is committed to playing a role in the expansion and deepening of Africa’s investment opportunities. This new ETF offers an easy, safe way to invest in African markets and supports the continent’s growth journey.”

ETFs are investments that track the performance of a group or “basket” of shares, bonds or commodities. They can offer tax and cost benefits to some investments, and are good for investors who do not want to pick and choose individual shares, but they are also used by institutional investors. They are regulated by the JSE and the Financial Services Board (FSB) and can be acquired, like any other listed share, through a stockbroker or online trading account, or via an investment platform that offers a monthly debit-order facility.

Maurice Madiba, CEO and Founding Director of Cloud Atlas Investing, said: “We want to improve liquidity and help to develop African markets for investors to feel the full robustness of these markets, and as such, have chosen to invest in stocks that are listed on African exchanges. These could include stocks in multinationals that are listed on African exchanges, as well as local African companies.”

The fund is available for individual and institutional investors. Regulation 28 of the South African Pension Funds Act allows pension funds to invest up to 5% per cent of a fund’s capital in African investments outside South Africa. Madiba explained: “We have received a dispensation from the South African Reserve Bank to offer this ETF to institutional investors according to Regulation 28. We have already opened up the ETF to the retail market, and certainly have plans to bring the institutional investor on board. We believe this ETF is a good product to have for the long-term investor because of its growth prospects, and as such will be of interest to both the individual and the institutional investor. It is important to us that we try to facilitate ways in which Africans can participate in Africa’s growth.”

Nemer adds it offers South African investors a wider opportunity to share in Africa’s growth and “Rand-hedging opportunities.”

According to this report on website ETF Strategy, the fund has certain concentrated exposures including significant country exposure to Morocco (28.4%) and Egypt (19.3%), as well as highly concentrated single holdings in Moroccan telecoms firm Itissalat Al Maghrib (20.6%) and Egyptian bank CIB (11.0%). Other top exposures include Nigeria (13.7%), Kenya (11.0%) and stocks listed on the BRVM Exchange in West Africa (6.3%). The top sector exposures are to banks (29.3%), telecoms (27.9%), food & beverage (17.7%) and industrials (14.6%). (Data as of March 2017). The fund has total fees of 1.17%.

The ETF market has seen steady growth globally as well as in South Africa. There are 53 ETFs listed on the JSE, with a total ETF market capitalization of almost R73 billion ($5.4bn). Several providers offer various indexes on African markets including regional indexes.

Prejelin Naggan, Head of Primary Markets, Johannesburg Stock Exchange and Maurice Madiba, CEO and Founding Director of Cloud Atlas Investing. Photo: JSE

World Exchange Congress 2017: First step – get domestic capital markets right

Here are some key points from the panel on “Alternative exchanges and connecting the African markets: What do you need to know?” at the World Exchange Congress 2017 in Budapest. All are CEOs: Moderator: Hirander Misra, Chairman and CEO, GMEX Group; Thapelo Tsheole, Botswana Stock Exchange; Moremi Marwa, Dar Es Salaam Stock Exchange; Sunil Benimadhu, Stock Exchange of Mauritius.

Q1: How to develop frontier African stock markets? Benimadhu: “We look at what our niche products are, that we do better than others. We list those products on the exchange. Then we think: ‘How we reach out to the world and tell our story?’ We need to make sure trading on our exchange is easy, efficient and meets international standards. Then we can look beyond our borders and ask what does the region need?”

Q2: Should you offer risk mitigation for currencies? Tanzania, Botswana and Mauritius are all open for investors to take their capital out, Mauritius was one of the first African markets to drop exchange control; it was brave as it’s a small economy, but it found the capital flowing in soon became more than the capital flowing out.
Protecting against changes in value of African currencies such as KES and NGN will be very important for attracting foreign investors, for inter-African trade and for trading in derivatives linked to international currencies. Benimadhu – Mauritius (and other markets) are looking at exchange-traded linked products to mitigate currency risk “there is a strong need to come up with a very sophisticated derivatives platform for mitigating currency risk”.

Q3: Inter-African stock-market links? Marwa: “We are harmonizing our trading rules among the 4 markets in the region – Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda – with the help of the World Bank. We are building an infrastructure based in Tanzania combining our automated trading systems (ATS) and central securities depositories (CSDs). In the Southern African Development Community (SADC) we are also making some progress in harmonizing and integrating our markets.
“Investors would rather see us as one big market, instead of small markets. For any issuer, reaching out the whole region will attract wider interest. In Tanzania we are well placed for this and we encourage harmonization and integration.”
Benimadhu “I have seen examples of larger markets and we should learn from that and use their experience. Take the case of Australia and Singapore, they allowed brokers from Singapore to trade in Australia and vice versa to increase order flow. After 10 years they scrapped it, it did not generate expected volumes. Many of the others have also fallen short of expectations. One which is working is Hong Kong-Shanghai but that is for specific reasons, including access to the Chinese market.
“I am a contrarian. I believe linkages make sense, but before doing that it makes sense to grow the domestic market. Open up, attract foreign flows. Don’t spend a lot of time and energy on linkages, but focus first on growing the domestic market. We should follow regional links, but they should not sidetrack us from where we should concentrate, on our own markets”.

London Stock Exchange £24.5bn merger with Deutsche Börse in doubt

Doubt has been cast on the EUR29bn (£24.5bn) merger between London Stock Exchange Group plc and Deutsche Börse AG this week, after the European Commission demanded LSE must sell off its 60% stake in fixed-income trading platform MTS S.p.A. This is a part of LSE’s Italian business and an important clearing house for European government bonds, including Italian government debt.
The LSE says the EC is “unlikely to provide clearance” after it surprised the City and refused to comply with the demand. It said on Sunday that the request was “disproportionate”.
The deal had been announced a year ago as a “merger of equals” to create a mega-exchange capable of taking on the US exchanges. The European Commission could announce its verdict on 4 April.
LSE and Deutsche Börse had previously agreed to sell the French part of LSE’s clearing business, LCH, to satisfy competition concerns. Rival Euronext was the interested bidder. That may not go ahead.
LSE said that selling its stake in MTS would require approval from several European national regulators and hurt its wider Italian business, where MTS is classified as a “systemically important regulated business”. The LSE also owns Borsa Italiana, based in Milan.
In its statement, LSE said: “Taking all relevant factors into account, and acting in the best interests of shareholders, the LSE Board today concluded that it could not commit to the divestment of MTS.”
US exchanges, including Intercontinental Exchange, headquartered in Atlanta, may now start bidding for the LSE Group.
The 2 leading European exchanges had previously tried to merge in 2000 and 2005. In the current deal, Deutsche Börse, which operates Frankfurt Stock Exchange, will have a 54% stake in the enlarged business but the headquarters was forecast to stay in London. There were concerns post UK’s “Brexit” vote to leave the European Union that considerable volumes of clearing, especially securities denominated in euros, would move to Europe.
LSE and Deutsche Börse say the deal is still on, pending the European Commission verdict. Fees so far to City bankers, lawyers and public relations advisers have so far topped £300m, according to calculations on an announcement.
Deutsche Börse also operates the Luxembourg-based clearing house Clearstream and derivatives platform Eurex. It commented: “The parties will await the further assessment by the European commission and currently expect a decision by the European commission on the merger of Deutsche Börse and LSE by the end of March 2017.”

Paternoster Square with London Stock Exchange at right (credit: Wikipedia)