Archive for the 'Stock Exchanges' Category

Latest on developments in African capital markets

Presentations from the exciting Building African Financial Markets (BAFM) seminar are now available on the Internet. The 6th edition of BAFM was hosted the first time in North Africa by the Casablanca Stock Exchange (CSE) in Morocco on 18-19 May, 2017. The seminars are organized with the African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA).

The theme of the event was “Global Best Practices to Enhance the African Capital Markets”, I was compere and there were many top presentations which you can download here. It provided a great platform for sharing information and discussing best ways the exchanges can support Africa’s needs for long-term capital.

According to the host, Karim Hajji, Deputy President of ASEA and CEO of the Casablanca Bourse: “The Casablanca Stock Exchange is more than ever before convinced of the important role of African exchanges in mobilizing the means for financing the continent’s growth. BAFM is indeed an opportunity to consider new paths of cooperation and enhance synergies so as to improve the role of Exchanges in financing the African economy.”

BAFM is a capacity-building initiative designed to promote growth in African financial markets. The Casablanca meeting attracted more than 100 delegates from within and outside Africa. There were very many top speakers including: Abimbola Ogunbanjo (First Vice President of the Nigerian Stock Exchange), Ronald Webb (Director – Financial Services, Safaricom Ltd), Riccardo Ambrosini, (Climate Finance Specialist, IFC World Bank Group) and Selloua Chakri (Head of Market Structure Strategy MEA Region, Bloomberg L.P.).
This high-level meeting provided a.

Oscar N. Onyema, President of ASEA and CEO of the Nigerian Stock Exchange, said; “Building the African financial market is our collective responsibility, hence we must seek out knowledge that empowers each of us to remove impediments to the advancement of our market.”

To view the presentations as well as the pictures of the Seminar, please visit http://www.african-exchanges.org/sites/default/files/publications/building_african_financial_markets.pdf and http://www.african-exchanges.org/en/media#contentCarousel/gallery respectively.

Progress of real-estate investment trusts (REITs) in financing Africa

“There are only 32 REITs (real-estate investment trusts) in Africa with South Africa being the largest REIT market having 27 REITs and Nigeria second with 3 REITs listed”, according to Oscar Onyema, CEO of the Nigerian Stock Exchange. He said REITs are only available in 4 countries – Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya – and their total value was $29 billion. (TM NOTE: Mauritius and some other markets also list real-estate investment companies under general or other listing regulations, without specific rules for REITs).

Onyema said that the volume of transactions had climbed from $65 million across Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana in 2012 to an estimated $265m worth of transactions in 2015. “This indicates an increasing market as a larger number of investors are beginning to take increased interest and participation in the Real Estate Investment sector.

“Whilst the Nigerian market may not be as developed as other emerging markets such as Mexico, South Africa and Singapore, this asset class has definitely come to stay. Today we have about N40bn ($126.8m) in REITs market cap (capitalization) listed on the NSE and a total of N96b in the construction/ real estate sector of our equity market”.

Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Raji Fashola (who was represented by Ayo Gbeleyi, Managing Partner of GA Capital Limited) said Government would use the stock exchange among other tools to raise finance for housing: “It is difficult, if not impossible, for Government to provide all housing solutions given the diverse demands. Best practices in places like the UK, US, Canada and Singapore are stories of a mixture of ownership and rental arrangements.

”In the medium term, we intend to raise more capital outside direct Government Treasury, working with the Federal Ministry of Finance, through Infrastructure bonds, REITS and other forms of real-estate financing instruments, leveraging as most appropriate the platform of the Nigerian Stock Exchange”. Other funding sources include pension funds, private equity funds and the National Housing Fund managed by the Federal Mortgage Bank.

Onyema said the exchange is implementing changes in the reporting and valuation of REITs and other collective investment schemes listed on the NSE, in order “to create a more transparent, liquid and accessible market structure in line with global best practices for REITs”.

Abimbola Ogunbanjo, the first Vice President of the National Council of NSE, said the Nigerian REITs market is largely underdeveloped due to lack of clarity on regulatory issues: “The major challenges facing the REITs industry in Nigeria include restrictive legislation, poor knowledge and understanding of the industry in addition to prolonged bottlenecks created by the Land Use Act of 1978. Nigeria’s Land Use Act is embedded in the Constitution of our country. Thus, any attempt to rectify its inadequacies requires a constitutional amendment which of itself is a major challenge”

The speakers were at a recent conference at the Nigerian bourse to promote real estate investment trusts (REITs in Africa). It was sponsored by Stanbic IBTC Holdings Plc, FSDH Asset Management Limited, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), United Property Development Company (UPDC) Plc, Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) Nigeria Limited, Udo Udoma & Belo-Osagie and Mixta Nigeria. Click for NSE press release and photos.

RETS conference: Photo Nigerian Stock Exchange.

Top speakers for BAFM capacity-building seminar 18-19 May


Leaders and movers of African capital markets are heading to Casablanca for the 6th Building African Financial Markets (BAFM) capacity-building seminar on 18-19 May, organized by Casablanca Stock Exchange with the African Securities Exchanges Association and supported by member exchanges.
This year focuses on “Global best practices to enhance African capital markets”. The agenda features CEOs of top African exchanges and other industry leaders: Oscar Onyema CEO of Nigerian Stock Exchange and President of ASEA, Siobhan Cleary of the World Federation of Exchanges, Karim Hajji CEO of Casablanca Stock Exchange, and speakers from Bloomberg, International Finance Corporation, Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, Tanzania Capital Markets and Securities Authority, Securities and Exchange Commission (Nigeria), Safaricom, Kenya Retirement Benefits Authority, Maroclear, and many others.
Topics include: demutualization and growth, what the new US administration means for African markets, financial inclusion, pensions, liquidity, green finance, global principles on IT infrastructure, and regional integration of exchanges in East, West and Southern Africa.
It will be held at Casablanca Most Events Business Center, Anfa Place, Casablanca, Morocco. Don’t miss a great chance to meet the drivers of Africa’s capital markets development. For more, check the Casablanca Stock Exchange website page.

JSE listed ETF offers 15 African exchanges ex-South Africa

A new exchange-traded fund (ETF) offers investors access to an index covering 50 companies across Africa outside South Africa. The AMI Big50 Ex-SA ETF tracks a new index designed by Cloud Atlas Investing, a Johannesburg-based collective investment scheme. It covers shares in 15 African exchanges including Egypt, Mauritius, Kenya, Morocco, Tanzania, Nigeria, Tunisia, Botswana, Namibia, Uganda, Ghana and Zimbabwe, as well as the BRVM Exchange in West Africa.

The ETF was listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange on 20 April. Donna Nemer, Director of Capital Markets at the JS, said in a press release: “The JSE is committed to playing a role in the expansion and deepening of Africa’s investment opportunities. This new ETF offers an easy, safe way to invest in African markets and supports the continent’s growth journey.”

ETFs are investments that track the performance of a group or “basket” of shares, bonds or commodities. They can offer tax and cost benefits to some investments, and are good for investors who do not want to pick and choose individual shares, but they are also used by institutional investors. They are regulated by the JSE and the Financial Services Board (FSB) and can be acquired, like any other listed share, through a stockbroker or online trading account, or via an investment platform that offers a monthly debit-order facility.

Maurice Madiba, CEO and Founding Director of Cloud Atlas Investing, said: “We want to improve liquidity and help to develop African markets for investors to feel the full robustness of these markets, and as such, have chosen to invest in stocks that are listed on African exchanges. These could include stocks in multinationals that are listed on African exchanges, as well as local African companies.”

The fund is available for individual and institutional investors. Regulation 28 of the South African Pension Funds Act allows pension funds to invest up to 5% per cent of a fund’s capital in African investments outside South Africa. Madiba explained: “We have received a dispensation from the South African Reserve Bank to offer this ETF to institutional investors according to Regulation 28. We have already opened up the ETF to the retail market, and certainly have plans to bring the institutional investor on board. We believe this ETF is a good product to have for the long-term investor because of its growth prospects, and as such will be of interest to both the individual and the institutional investor. It is important to us that we try to facilitate ways in which Africans can participate in Africa’s growth.”

Nemer adds it offers South African investors a wider opportunity to share in Africa’s growth and “Rand-hedging opportunities.”

According to this report on website ETF Strategy, the fund has certain concentrated exposures including significant country exposure to Morocco (28.4%) and Egypt (19.3%), as well as highly concentrated single holdings in Moroccan telecoms firm Itissalat Al Maghrib (20.6%) and Egyptian bank CIB (11.0%). Other top exposures include Nigeria (13.7%), Kenya (11.0%) and stocks listed on the BRVM Exchange in West Africa (6.3%). The top sector exposures are to banks (29.3%), telecoms (27.9%), food & beverage (17.7%) and industrials (14.6%). (Data as of March 2017). The fund has total fees of 1.17%.

The ETF market has seen steady growth globally as well as in South Africa. There are 53 ETFs listed on the JSE, with a total ETF market capitalization of almost R73 billion ($5.4bn). Several providers offer various indexes on African markets including regional indexes.

Prejelin Naggan, Head of Primary Markets, Johannesburg Stock Exchange and Maurice Madiba, CEO and Founding Director of Cloud Atlas Investing. Photo: JSE

World Exchange Congress 2017: First step – get domestic capital markets right

Here are some key points from the panel on “Alternative exchanges and connecting the African markets: What do you need to know?” at the World Exchange Congress 2017 in Budapest. All are CEOs: Moderator: Hirander Misra, Chairman and CEO, GMEX Group; Thapelo Tsheole, Botswana Stock Exchange; Moremi Marwa, Dar Es Salaam Stock Exchange; Sunil Benimadhu, Stock Exchange of Mauritius.

Q1: How to develop frontier African stock markets? Benimadhu: “We look at what our niche products are, that we do better than others. We list those products on the exchange. Then we think: ‘How we reach out to the world and tell our story?’ We need to make sure trading on our exchange is easy, efficient and meets international standards. Then we can look beyond our borders and ask what does the region need?”

Q2: Should you offer risk mitigation for currencies? Tanzania, Botswana and Mauritius are all open for investors to take their capital out, Mauritius was one of the first African markets to drop exchange control; it was brave as it’s a small economy, but it found the capital flowing in soon became more than the capital flowing out.
Protecting against changes in value of African currencies such as KES and NGN will be very important for attracting foreign investors, for inter-African trade and for trading in derivatives linked to international currencies. Benimadhu – Mauritius (and other markets) are looking at exchange-traded linked products to mitigate currency risk “there is a strong need to come up with a very sophisticated derivatives platform for mitigating currency risk”.

Q3: Inter-African stock-market links? Marwa: “We are harmonizing our trading rules among the 4 markets in the region – Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda – with the help of the World Bank. We are building an infrastructure based in Tanzania combining our automated trading systems (ATS) and central securities depositories (CSDs). In the Southern African Development Community (SADC) we are also making some progress in harmonizing and integrating our markets.
“Investors would rather see us as one big market, instead of small markets. For any issuer, reaching out the whole region will attract wider interest. In Tanzania we are well placed for this and we encourage harmonization and integration.”
Benimadhu “I have seen examples of larger markets and we should learn from that and use their experience. Take the case of Australia and Singapore, they allowed brokers from Singapore to trade in Australia and vice versa to increase order flow. After 10 years they scrapped it, it did not generate expected volumes. Many of the others have also fallen short of expectations. One which is working is Hong Kong-Shanghai but that is for specific reasons, including access to the Chinese market.
“I am a contrarian. I believe linkages make sense, but before doing that it makes sense to grow the domestic market. Open up, attract foreign flows. Don’t spend a lot of time and energy on linkages, but focus first on growing the domestic market. We should follow regional links, but they should not sidetrack us from where we should concentrate, on our own markets”.

London Stock Exchange £24.5bn merger with Deutsche Börse in doubt

Doubt has been cast on the EUR29bn (£24.5bn) merger between London Stock Exchange Group plc and Deutsche Börse AG this week, after the European Commission demanded LSE must sell off its 60% stake in fixed-income trading platform MTS S.p.A. This is a part of LSE’s Italian business and an important clearing house for European government bonds, including Italian government debt.
The LSE says the EC is “unlikely to provide clearance” after it surprised the City and refused to comply with the demand. It said on Sunday that the request was “disproportionate”.
The deal had been announced a year ago as a “merger of equals” to create a mega-exchange capable of taking on the US exchanges. The European Commission could announce its verdict on 4 April.
LSE and Deutsche Börse had previously agreed to sell the French part of LSE’s clearing business, LCH, to satisfy competition concerns. Rival Euronext was the interested bidder. That may not go ahead.
LSE said that selling its stake in MTS would require approval from several European national regulators and hurt its wider Italian business, where MTS is classified as a “systemically important regulated business”. The LSE also owns Borsa Italiana, based in Milan.
In its statement, LSE said: “Taking all relevant factors into account, and acting in the best interests of shareholders, the LSE Board today concluded that it could not commit to the divestment of MTS.”
US exchanges, including Intercontinental Exchange, headquartered in Atlanta, may now start bidding for the LSE Group.
The 2 leading European exchanges had previously tried to merge in 2000 and 2005. In the current deal, Deutsche Börse, which operates Frankfurt Stock Exchange, will have a 54% stake in the enlarged business but the headquarters was forecast to stay in London. There were concerns post UK’s “Brexit” vote to leave the European Union that considerable volumes of clearing, especially securities denominated in euros, would move to Europe.
LSE and Deutsche Börse say the deal is still on, pending the European Commission verdict. Fees so far to City bankers, lawyers and public relations advisers have so far topped £300m, according to calculations on an announcement.
Deutsche Börse also operates the Luxembourg-based clearing house Clearstream and derivatives platform Eurex. It commented: “The parties will await the further assessment by the European commission and currently expect a decision by the European commission on the merger of Deutsche Börse and LSE by the end of March 2017.”

Paternoster Square with London Stock Exchange at right (credit: Wikipedia)

New South African stock exchange ZAR X to start 3 October

Trading is to start on South Africa’s new ZAR X securities exchange on 3 October. It gained a licence on 2 September and the first listings will be Senwes and  Senwes Beleggings, with up to 5 listings planned for first week October.

Another exchange is also being readied, 4AX also called 4 Africa Exchange (see story below).

South Africa’s regulator, the Financial Services Board, announced on 2 September that it had granted licences to ZAR X and 4 Africa Exchange Licences. It said: “The Registrar of Securities Services.. received and considered applications for exchange licences from ZARX (Pty) Ltd (“ZAR X”) and 4 Africa Exchange (Pty) Ltd (“4AX”) and has, in terms of section 9(1) of the Act, granted ZAR X and 4AX exchange licences with conditions after careful consideration of objections received as a result of a notice referred to in section 7(4).”

Initially FSB gave ZARX a conditional licence but in August a court ruled in favour of an application by the JSE, which had argued there was no provision for conditional licensing. JSE CEO Nicky Newton-King said at the time there were concerns about the complexity and the potential for systemic risk that multiple exchanges could bring.

ZAR X has a different level of risk as it requires to be pre-funded, which means that participants must lodge scrip and cash before they trade and settlement is then the same day (T+0). In July the JSE and other market participants moved their market from T+5 settlement to T+3 without any problems. Most institutional investors prefer transferring stocks or money after they have traded, when they know the exact amounts to transfer.

Etienne Nel, CEO of ZAR X, said: “We need to create a level of co-operation within the market space to make it as simple as possible for all participants to coexist”.

Speaking to Business Day TV, he said: “..we are very happy, obviously, delighted since it’s been a long time coming. To give you some context around the conditions, it’s obviously what we applied for. We initially said we were not going to be offering derivatives to the market and obviously as a result one of the conditions is we may not offer derivative trades on our market. Similarly, we cannot offer shares already listed on another exchange, but that was never in our application so we are obviously delighted with the licence that we finally got.”

Nel said in September they were busy getting brokers on board and putting investors through necessary screening and checks of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act (38 of 2001 “FICA”)

Nel says ZAR X has less onerous rules on admitting companies for trading (listing requirements): “In our approach to listings.. we will have a conversation with the issuer and we are taking what is called a principles-based approach to listing rather than rules-based. Now what that achieves is if we get the slightest inclination that something is awry within a company we would actually rather walk away rather than doing the listing.. A rules-based environment .. becomes a tick-box exercise and in that environment you would end up with a situation where people end up finding loopholes, which a principles-based approach does not allow for”.

It breaks over 100 years of monopoly Africa by the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, as the JSE was founded in 1887 but there were several stock exchanges around during the first South African gold rush. Speaking after the licence was issued, 4AX CEO Fay Mukaddam said in a press release: “We are delighted to have secured our licence. South Africa is a vibrant, growing market with enormous potential and we are confident that there’s a strong appetite for an additional licensed exchange to further develop and deepen the capital markets in the country.. 4AX can stand as a vehicle for diversity, which in turn, will drive real economic inclusion”. It will be an “empowered exchange” and will aim at retail investors but also attract institutional trading.

Both ZARX and 4AX will use Strate as their central securities depository (CSD).

 

Etienne Nel, CEO of ZAR X (credit timeslive.co.za)

Etienne Nel, CEO of ZAR X (credit timeslive.co.za)

About 4AX – new South African securities exchange

South Africa’s second new exchange, which also got a licence according to the 2 September announcement by the Financial Services Board (FSB), is 4AX, also known as 4 Africa Exchange. It plans to trade securities that are currently traded over-the-counter (OTC) and to go live early in 2017.

Speaking after the licence was issued, 4AX CEO Fay Mukaddam said in a press release: “We are delighted to have secured our licence. South Africa is a vibrant, growing market with enormous potential and we are confident that there’s a strong appetite for an additional licensed exchange to further develop and deepen the capital markets in the country.. 4AX can stand as a vehicle for diversity, which in turn, will drive real economic inclusion”. It will be an “empowered exchange” and will aim at retail investors but also attract institutional trading.

According to the background on its website: “A unique situation in South Africa has however created the need for 4AX. Previously, a number of South African companies issued shares and facilitated trading in the over-the-counter (OTC) market using unregulated OTC platforms. The current OTC market boasts a combined market capitalisation in excess of R30 billion ($2.2bn).

“As the OTC market expanded, the FSB recognised a need for greater regulation to protect shareholders and ensure a fair, orderly and transparent marketplace for issuers. The FSB determined that all operators of unregulated OTC platforms must cease operating or apply to become licensed exchanges under the Financial Market Act of 2012 (FMA). Board Notice 68 of 2014 reaffirmed the view of the Registrar that operators of exchange infrastructure should be licensed and that a proliferation of exchanges should not be allowed. This has caused significant upheaval in the market, for both issuers as well as shareholders.

“As a result of the regulatory amendments a substantial number of OTC companies are now in breach of the FMA. Faced with significant potential penalties under the FMA these companies have either stopped operating their OTC platforms or applied for extensions from the FSB, whilst searching for an alternative to unregulated OTC platforms. 4AX provide the solution.

Maponya Group has a 15% shareholding, other shareholders listed on its website include Global Environmental Markets Ltd, Capital Market Brokers which is a leading member of the Stock Exchange of Mauritius, independent fiduciary Intercontinental Trust Ltd,  agricultural firm NWK, and investment banking firm Pallidus.

Opinion: Steps for regional integration of capital markets

YOUR COMMENTS AND DISCUSSION ARE WELCOMED!

In mature capital markets, regional integration shows significant benefits in unlocking potential and allowing investors to mobilize liquidity across borders by interconnecting diverse markets. Regional integration seems to be the future of world capital markets.

Can it also work for African capital markets, many of which face considerable problems of liquidity?

Many parts of the world have already tackled integration and each has faced its own challenges. In the past, the state of the technology and the feasibility of effective regional integration used to be a major challenge, and often offset the benefits.

This has changed. The technology has become cost-effective and industrial standards have evolved, based upon the widespread experience and solid implementations in different regions. Remaining challenges that still prevent smooth implementation are not in technology but in the business processes and political will.

First it is important to understand the landscape. Africa’s exchanges are usually divided into 4 categories:
• Dominant market: South Africa is the biggest contender
• Medium-size market: Each region tends to have its leading market
• Emerging markets: Several markets are growing fast and showing innovation and determination
• Markets yet to take off: Some are recently established, some are showing slow growth.

As African stock markets have become larger and more prevalent over the last 10 years, there have been preliminary moves towards regional integration. This is the global trend, but more importantly because integration can meet the mutual needs of the exchanges themselves.

Lack of liquidity is a major constraint to attracting influxes of foreign capital (portfolio investment) and to efficient allocation of savings and asset pricing. The different businesses (shares) on offer can be limited and the size of potential deals is often small. Pricing and other cross-comparisons within sectors and across companies can be difficult.

Efficient securities markets in Africa will help exchanges act as efficient channels for the growing pools of domestic savings funds (pensions and insurance) towards national growth and development – both infrastructure and enterprises – as well as providing comfort for foreign and domestic investors. Links and eventual integration between national stock exchanges is the way to ensure this.

Talk of pan-African or other continental structures can be a distraction. It may overlook the necessary work to be done on national and regional limits, including exchange controls, prudential regulations, macro-economic stability and others. It ignores the key roles of local securities exchanges, which are already central in their national economies and have working legal frameworks and institutional set-ups that can be built upon.

Each market has evolved according to the needs of the market participants and the challenges that have been impacting them. Each has its own electronic platforms built for the local practices. Existing micro-level frameworks can prevent change being introduced in a straightforward fashion. For example, in certain markets, turn-around trading is yet not available and settlement procedures are longer than necessary. Regional integration can take this into account if it involves a pragmatic framework that accommodates the composition of the markets.

In most regions, regulations are a key limitation on integration. The enabling environment for integration requires common policies, institutions and regional frameworks and, above all, the necessary political commitment that ensures macroeconomic stability. Cross-border settlements are difficult as there are no common currencies and the cost of trading is higher due to intermediary costs. Regulatory work to be overcome includes tackling national exchange controls, harmonization of regulations and recognizing each other’s institutions and intermediaries. Prudential limits on cross-border funds’ investments and regulations that stop share offers being marketed across borders could also be rolled back.

Political will is needed to recognize the importance of national structures and to recognize the added value of an integrated regional structure.

Regional integration demands not only that participants agree on a common standard of procedures at the higher level, but that there are platforms to support the regional integration charter. Initially the process may be structured around entities that exchange information with each other but operate on their own.

An ideal is to think towards forming one mega-enterprise with national outposts – Africa’s example is the BRVM which provides an integrated exchange linking 8 markets and is firmly anchored in the considerable monetary and policy integration structures in the francophone region. The evolving future regional exchanges should link all stakeholders through a set of global processes that bridge the gaps between the diverse systems that exist at various levels and connect all to bring value to customers.

There have already been some healthy efforts by Africa’s regional economic communities. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is supporting linkages between regulators, central bankers and the Committee of SADC Securities Exchanges. Strong advances include the SIRESS cross-border payments systems and cooperation and harmonization between exchanges and regulators, including on listing requirements. The West Africa Capital Markets Integration Council considerable progress has extended to mutual recognition of stockbrokers and regional structures, as highlighted in this blog, and cross-border share deals between national exchanges, in addition to its ground-breaking BRVM regional exchange for 8 countries. The African Development Bank (AfDB) and other multilaterals and finance institutions are supporting important projects.

One of the leaders is the East African Community (EAC), following the signature and ratification of its Common Market Protocol. The EAC Secretariat, working with the World Bank and other development partners, established the EAC Financial Sector Development and Regionalization Project I (EAC-FSDRP I) to support the development of the financial sector through the establishment of a single market in financial services among EAC Partner States. The project objective is to establish the foundation for financial-sector integration among EAC partner States, including the broadening and deepening of the financial sector through the establishment of a single market in financial services, with a view to making a wide range of financial products and services available to all, at competitive prices. InfoTech, a Pakistani IT vendor with expertise in capital markets, particularly in Africa, is delivering the capital markets linkages.

To complement work on the IT and other systems, there is much to be done at policy-making level to harmonize the rules of the game across the region, backed by full commitment of all direct and indirect stakeholders, such as stock exchanges, depository companies, regulatory authorities etc. and their IT vendors to support their existing systems so they can support the regional integration.

Implementing the capital markets regional integration project will be a big milestone and a big step in tackling the core issues that hinder effective integration. The prospects are huge.

Capacity-building at all levels is also critical. Policymakers and regulators need to enhance skills on how to grow efficient markets to ensure they support national and regional development objectives. Exchanges, brokers, banks and key advisors such as lawyers are also central. Knowledge and skills among potential issuers, including small and medium-enterprises, and investors including both institutions and the investing public, all contribute to fast growth of more efficient markets.

Integration has already been proven in advanced markets and the technology works. The biggest challenge and responsibility is with the policymakers who have to formulate a governance framework with effective support to implement the framework at grassroots level.

Working together, African capital markets are moving to the next level of their evolution.

 

Ethos Capital PE lists after R1.8bn oversubscribed private placement

Private equity company Ethos Capital, based in Mauritius, listed on South Africa’s JSE on 5 August after R1.8 billion ($131 million) oversubscribed private placement for institutional investors. The listing is a unique combination of a liquid listed share which invests into a diversified pool of unlisted private equity investments. It is aimed particularly at institutional investors, including pension funds.
Ethos had placed 180m A ordinary shares at R10.00 each. Rand Merchant Bank was the financial advisor, sole global coordinator, bookrunner and JSE sponsor. The first trade on Friday was at R10.26, pushing market capitalization up to R1.85bn.
The new fund starts as a cash shell and will invest into a portfolio of unlisted investments with Ethos Private Equity, sub-Saharan Africa’s largest private equity firm, acting as the new company’s fund manager and advisor.
Stuart MacKenzie, CEO of Ethos Private Equity, said in a press release: “Growth is a central principle of Ethos Private Equity’s strategy: value is added by actively transforming the strategy, operations and finances of investee businesses, striving to make them best-in-class. Through pioneering thought leadership, creativity and innovation, Ethos Private Equity has developed a long track record of sustainable investor returns.”
Peter Hayward-Butt, CEO at Ethos Capital, said: “We look forward to investing alongside Ethos Private Equity into high-potential businesses, supporting economic growth and job creation in the long term whilst simultaneously delivering value to our shareholders.”
Ethos Private Equity has a 32-year history and has invested in 104 acquisitions of which 91 have been realized, delivering investment returns with a gross realised internal rate of return (IRR) of 37.4%.

Stuart Mackenzie, CEO Ethos Private Equity

Stuart Mackenzie, CEO Ethos Private Equity

Ethos Capital is expected to invest into:
• Primary investments into various funds to be raised and managed by Ethos Private Equity. EPE is reported to be planning to fund raise for Ethos VII fund by early 2017, targeting R8bn-R10bn with 25% for investments in sub-Saharan Africa outside South Africa. Ethos Capital is to commit up to R2.5bn. There is also plans for: a R2.5bn-R3bn Ethos Mid Market Fund I targeting deals of between R100m-R350m which will be majority black-owned and chaired by Sonja de Bruyn Sebotsa, according to Financial Mail, and Ethos Mezzanine Fund I which aims to raise R1.5bn and will be run by a team which formerly operated as Mezzanine Partners.
• Secondary investments by buying interests owned by limited partners (LPs) in existing Ethos funds. This could include up to $600m invested into Ethos VI fund which closed at $800m in 2013 (against a $750m target), according to Private Equity Africa website.
• Direct investments into investee companies alongside Ethos funds
• Temporary investments including a portfolio of low-risk, liquid debt instruments such as South African government bonds and similar instruments, managed by Ashburton Fund Managers.
According to the prospectus, Ethos Capital investors will be charged a management fee of 1.5% of invested net asset value and 0.25% on cash balances. The investors are offered 20% exposure to growth, subject to a 10% hurdle.
Previously Brait, another leading South African private equity company, had listed its portfolio.
Mackenzie says South Africa does not have enough investments in alternative assets such as private equity, according to the Financial Mail, which reports they make up barely 2% of pension fund assets compared with 20% in many developed markets. The listed vehicle will enable funds to share in the outperformance of private equity but will mean they do not have to stay invested for the full fund life, often 10 years.
The report adds that Mackenzie promises investors will not be subjected to a double layer of fees and that Ethos Fund III and IV outperformed listed markets by more than 5% but Fund V, invested in the years before the financial crisis, underperformed listed markets by 2.4%.
A report by RisCura and the SA Venture Capital Association (Savca) shows that private equity in South Africa has generally outperformed the total comparative return of investment of the JSE’s all share and SWIX indices, returning an internal rate of return of 18.5 percent. Over the same period, EPE returned 20.9 percent on realised investments.
Key investors in the private placing reportedly included fund manager giants such as Coronation and Stanlib and emerging managers such as Mergence and Sentio.