Archive for the 'Real Estate' Category

Recent Africa share listings news

London and South Africa
Old Mutual Limited, an insurance company founded 173 years ago, moved its main listing back to Johannesburg on 26 June and has dual-listings in Namibia, Malawi, Zimbabwe and London, as reported by Bloomberg and Moneyweb. Old Mutual plc terminated its listing on the London Stock Exchange on 25 June, and spun off UK wealth manager Quilter plc which was listed separately on the LSE (and dual listed on the JSE) the same day with a market capitalization of £2.75bn based on a £1.45 share price. It also sold its US asset manager and Latin American units as it believed each unit would be worth more separately. The “home-coming” was marked with a parade in Sandton and events in Malawi, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Old Mutual had moved its head office and primary listing to London in 1999, according to Reuters, but now its prominent riverside London head office is being wound down, with staff down from 120 to 40 in 2018.
The stock was listed in Johannesburg at ZAR28.50, valuing the company at some ZAR140bn ($10.7bn). According to Sanlam analyst Renier de Bruyn, quoted by Bloomberg, the share price did not reflect the hoped-for “value unlock” and Old Mutual was at an “attractive” price-earnings ratio of 7.5x, compared to 13x for its biggest South African rival, Sanlam. Bloomberg quotes Brad Preston, chief investment officer at Mergence Investment Managers Ltd: “Old Mutual’s strategy of trying to build a completely global business I think clearly has failed. We’ve seen them reverse that completely.” It bought United Asset Management Corp in USA for $1.4 billion in 2000 and Skandia AB in Sweden for $8bn in 2006. Between mid-1999 and June 2018 Old Mutual’s shares in Johannesburg returned 480% while Sanlam’s returned almost 2,000%. Sanlam had focused on African markets and reached 34 countries, including buying out remaining shares in Morocco’s Saham Finances SA earlier in 2018 for $1.1bn. Old Mutual is only in 13 countries.
Next step will be the unbundling of shares in Nedbank Group by about December 2018. Old Mutual owns 53% since it bought in under apartheid capital controls in 1986 and it is expected to reduce that to 19.9%.

London
Microfinance firm ASA International listed on the London Stock Exchange on 13 July. Its 85% shareholder Catalyst Microfinance Investment had partially sold half its stake by offering 40m shares at GBP2.24 each. ASA International was set up in 2007 and is one of the larges and most profitable international microfinance institutions, with 1.8m clients, particularly low-income and underserved women entrepreneurs. It operates in Asia (7)%) and in Africa (30% of clients, including in Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone. It has 1,387 branches and employs 9,000 staff.

Mauritius and London
Grit Real Estate Income Group, a pan-African real estate company based in Mauritius and investing in 7 countries Botswana, Kenya, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Ghana and Zambia with plans for Senegal and the Seychelles, raised $132.1m through selling 92.4m shares at $1.43 each, before listing on the London Stock Exchange main board on 31 July. The new funds are for more investments in Mozambique and Ghana. Previously there were 214m shares listed in Johannesburg Stock Exchange and Stock Exchange of Mauritius. Bronwyn Corbett and Sandile Nomvete built the Delta International Property Fund from R2.2bn to R11.8bn. It became Mara Delta Property Holdings and was then rebranded Grit and the company headquarters moved to Mauritius, according to this 2017 interview in Finweek magazine.
Corbett commented in a press release: “”We are delighted to have successfully completed our Listing on London Stock Exchange and we are proud to be the first London listed pan-African real estate group”. Earlier she was quoted saying the African real estate sector “offers some of the best returns in the global property market. We have a proven track record of generating income from our selective and diversified range of assets, built through our close and detailed understanding of the region’s property investment environment. The listing will support our aim to grow our portfolio further and become the leading real estate owner on the African continent outside South Africa.” The share price was set at net asset value and the aim is to yield 12% a year in US dollars.

Nigeria
The Federal Government of Nigeria listed a NGN10.7 billion ($29.5m) FGN Green Bond 2022 on the Nigerian Stock Exchange on 21 July. It offered a coupon of 13.48% and aims to finance initiatives including solar plants and hydropower.

South Africa
Anchor Capital became the 9th listing on the A2X Markets on 19 July through a secondary listing. It was listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange’s AltX platform in September 2016 after raising ZAR60m ($5.4m) through an IPO.

African capital markets and innovation key to achieving African agenda

“The time is now to stop aspiring to building and focus on ensuring the African financial markets are actually built.”

    Paul Muthaura CMA Kenya (photo The East African)

  • African capital markets are key to African development visions but governments must prioritize market finance structures over donor and government-to-government finance.
  • How to mobilize over $1trn of assets in pension, insurance and collective investment vehicles across sub-Saharan Africa
  • Innovation at the core of Kenya’s 10-year capital markets masterplan, including M-Akiba bonds, regulatory sandbox, mobile platforms for securities trading
  • Governments to provide conducive environments
  • Capital markets connectivity to allow free flow of capital across borders to fund critical infrastructure for Continental Free Trade Area

Here are extracts from the speech by Paul Muthaura, CEO of the Capital Markets Authority of Kenya, this morning at the 7th annual “Building Africa Financial Markets Seminar” in Nairobi.

Also present was HE William Samoei Ruto (Deputy President of Kenya), Oscar Onyema (President of African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA) and Chief Executive Officer of the Nigerian Stock Exchange), Sam Kimani (Chairman of the Nairobi Securities Exchange) and Geoffrey Odundo (CEO of NSE).

“This conference also comes closely on the heels of the admission of the NSE to the World Federation of Exchanges which acknowledges the trajectory of our markets’ growth in recent years and reinvigorates us for the journey ahead as we seek to position the NSE as a globally competitive platform for wealth creation, a global cross roads for investment and risk management and a critical catalyst for economic transformation.

“The central role of deepening capital markets to finance infrastructure, business enterprise and overall economic development is increasingly a key pillar of policy makers’ agendas in Africa. For instance, the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063 prioritizes the development of capital markets on the continent to strengthen domestic resource mobilization and to double market-based financings’ contribution to development financing.

“Similar prioritization is found in several national visions including Nigeria’s FSS2020, Zambia’s Vision 2030, Rwanda’s Vision 2020, Uganda’s Vision 2040 and of course the Kenya Vision 2030. Over US$1 trillion in assets are currently held by pension, insurance and collective investment vehicles across sub-Saharan Africa so the challenge to us in this room remains how are we going to leverage these pools to crowd-in the significantly larger pools of global capital necessary to fund the meteoric rise of this continent.

Innovation

“Institutions or sectors that do not prioritize innovation are ultimately relegated to stunted growth, poor competitiveness and ultimately, redundancy. The very fact that we are all gathered here today affirms that as a continent we are committed to actively deliberating on proactively adapting to emerging innovations. To institutionalize this commitment to constructive innovation at a national level, the Authority was honoured to convene our sector and international partners to put in place the Capital Markets Masterplan (CMMP) – a 10-year strategic policy document that targets to stimulate innovation to broaden product and service offerings, deepen market participation and liquidity, and drive transformative economic development for Kenya and the wider region.

“Any conversation on innovation appears inseparable from a deliberation on the global efforts to continuously update business models in line with technological changes cutting across product/services design, infrastructure, access and supervision. To this last point, regulators are increasingly challenged to rethink their supervisory models to align regulatory requirements with market needs is a fast-changing environment.

“For some time now, Kenya has been sitting in a unique position as a bustling hub for impactful innovation, ranging from MPESA – a fast and convenient mobile money platform to M-Shwari – a mobile-based savings product. Not to be left behind, Kenya’s capital markets have through various initiatives have been angling to put the country on the global innovation map. These initiatives include;

  • The recent launch of M-Akiba – a mobile-phone-based retail government bond primary and secondary market investment platform,
  • The on-going efforts to establish a Regulatory Sandbox for Kenya’s capital markets to provide an ideal platform for testing of ideas/innovations/products/services etc. before they are rolled-out to the wider market; and
  • The development of a wide spectrum of mobile based platforms for securities trading.

“As a regulator cognisant of our dual mandate of regulation as well as development, the Authority has also operationalized principle-based approval powers to allow for the accelerated introduction of new products including exchange-traded Funds, GDR/Ns (global depository receipts) and asset-backed securities.

Right foundations

“It is critical, particularly given the nascent state of markets on most of the continent, that we do not lose sight of the critical importance to build our markets on the right foundations. In a world where we are eternally competing for highly mobile capital, we must prioritize the development and more critically the transparent enforcement of world class legal and regulatory frameworks; in pursuing innovation, we must not forsake robust market infrastructure that provides pre and post trade transparency and engenders confidence in settlement finality; we must ensure that the products and services being developed are actually relevant and responsive to the economic needs of our environment, resonate with the political priorities of our governments and strengthen the savings and investment habits of our citizenry.

“We must challenge our governments to provide conducive macro-economic, political and fiscal environments for markets to grow. Difficult as it may be, we must be willing to prioritize market-based funding models over traditional government-to-government and donor funding models. What appears concessionary today will likely be unsustainable tomorrow where the necessary market dynamics have not been built to support private sector growth and SME business as the engines for long-term sustainable economic growth and as a critical source of tax revenue to ensure debt service and sustainability.

“We must challenge our market intermediaries to raise their operational and technical standards to be able to support responsive product design and ethical practices, all parties need to come together to drive both issuer and investor education on the full spectrum of financing options available to them to ensure the supply side is as dynamic as the demand side’s need.

“We must challenge our domestic institutional investors to make the difficult decisions to diversify into appropriate market-based risk products that allow for effective asset-liability matching in place of traditional government debt and, needless to say, proactively work with government to consistently lower government borrowing rates in order to tackle the crowding-out effect all too common with the easy availability of double-digit risk-free assets.

“If we are to deliver robust African capital markets we must deepen the capacity of the complementary professionals, support independent auditor oversight, robust corporate governance and globally benchmarked certification standards.

“Introduction of REITS (real estate investment trusts), operationalizing collateral management and liquidity management tools like REPOs and securities lending and borrowing, Impending green finance, roll-out of Islamic finance, delivery of commodities exchange and warehouse infrastructure, derivatives markets to support hedging, online forex trading (FX CFDs), and leveraging fintech to support access and market growth, are all critical components in deepening and diversifying the capital markets that have received and continue to receive strong support from the government in partnership with market stakeholders.

Pan-African challenge

“With the introduction of the Continental Free Trade Area, it is for the capital markets to address pan-continental connectivity to allow for the free flow of capital across borders to fund the critical infrastructure necessary to support the free movement of goods and services under the free trade area. The time is now to stop aspiring to building and focus ensuring the African financial markets are actually built.

“As the capital markets regulator, we are keen on actively playing our role in positioning Kenya as an investment hub for East and middle Africa. By 2023, we envision Kenya as the choice market for domestic, regional and international issuers and investors looking for a safe and secure investment destination.”

For the full speech, see the CMA Kenya website.

African IPO pipeline includes $3bn Vivo Energy

Investors have been snapping up Africa-focused IPOs (initial public offers) of shares and more capital-raisings and stock-exchange listings are in the pipeline. Biggest of the upcoming African IPOs is a reported share offer by Vivo Energy, while miner AfriTin, investment and real estate company Cytonn and property company Hystead also said to be heading for the markets.

Earlier this month, Wall Street Journal reported that Netherlands-based Vivo Energy, which is licensed to distribute Shell fuel and lubricants in 16 African countries, is working with investment banks to act as underwriters. Its offer, planned for the London Stock Exchange, could value the company at $3 billion.

Vivo Energy (photo credit Vitol Africa)


Vivo was created in 2011 after Shell sold 80% of its downstream operations in 14 African countries to Dutch firm Vitol Africa BV and private equity fund Helios Investment Partners in a deal worth $1bn and then sold the balance to them for $250 million earlier this year. Vivo operates 1,800 Shell fuel stations and sells Shell-branded products such as liquefied petroleum gas and lubricants to aviation, marine and mining in 16 markets.

AfriTin is a newly formed tin company which is acquiring the tin assets of Bushveld Minerals in Namibia and South Africa and announced plans for a £2m ($2.6m) capital raise on the AIM market operated by the London Stock Exchange. The assets will include 85% of Uis Tin Project, the former workings of Uis mine in Namibia, and assets in South Africa including Mokopane and Zaaiplaats Tin Tailings project.

Pieter Prinsloo, CEO of South African real estate investment trust (REIT) Hyprop, focused on shopping centres, said it was looking to list UK subsidiary Hystead separately on the Johannesburg and Luxembourg stock exchanges in the first half of 2018, according to this news report. Hyprop owns 60% of Hystead, which has interests in 4 malls in Montenegro, Serbia, Macedonia and Bulgaria valued at EUR460m ($535m). Hyprop listed on the JSE in 1988 and has property assets in malls in South Africa, Ghana, Zambia and Nigeria.

Kenya’s Cytonn Investment plc changed into a public company in August using a 2015 provision in the Companies Act. It said it plans to list 10m shares by introduction on the Growth Enterprise Market Segment (GEMS) of the Nairobi Securities Exchange in mid-2018. CEO Edwin Dande said on CNBC . It is not raising new capital but seeking to diversify sources of funding and increase corporate governance, transparency and accountability.

CampusKey houses 4,000 students in 6 locations in South Africa. It says it will list on th JSE when it gets to 10,000 beds and says this is on track for 2019.

Thanks to research contribution by Enko Capital, which invests in IPOs and other African opportunities.

Progress of real-estate investment trusts (REITs) in financing Africa

“There are only 32 REITs (real-estate investment trusts) in Africa with South Africa being the largest REIT market having 27 REITs and Nigeria second with 3 REITs listed”, according to Oscar Onyema, CEO of the Nigerian Stock Exchange. He said REITs are only available in 4 countries – Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya – and their total value was $29 billion. (TM NOTE: Mauritius and some other markets also list real-estate investment companies under general or other listing regulations, without specific rules for REITs).

Onyema said that the volume of transactions had climbed from $65 million across Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana in 2012 to an estimated $265m worth of transactions in 2015. “This indicates an increasing market as a larger number of investors are beginning to take increased interest and participation in the Real Estate Investment sector.

“Whilst the Nigerian market may not be as developed as other emerging markets such as Mexico, South Africa and Singapore, this asset class has definitely come to stay. Today we have about N40bn ($126.8m) in REITs market cap (capitalization) listed on the NSE and a total of N96b in the construction/ real estate sector of our equity market”.

Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Raji Fashola (who was represented by Ayo Gbeleyi, Managing Partner of GA Capital Limited) said Government would use the stock exchange among other tools to raise finance for housing: “It is difficult, if not impossible, for Government to provide all housing solutions given the diverse demands. Best practices in places like the UK, US, Canada and Singapore are stories of a mixture of ownership and rental arrangements.

”In the medium term, we intend to raise more capital outside direct Government Treasury, working with the Federal Ministry of Finance, through Infrastructure bonds, REITS and other forms of real-estate financing instruments, leveraging as most appropriate the platform of the Nigerian Stock Exchange”. Other funding sources include pension funds, private equity funds and the National Housing Fund managed by the Federal Mortgage Bank.

Onyema said the exchange is implementing changes in the reporting and valuation of REITs and other collective investment schemes listed on the NSE, in order “to create a more transparent, liquid and accessible market structure in line with global best practices for REITs”.

Abimbola Ogunbanjo, the first Vice President of the National Council of NSE, said the Nigerian REITs market is largely underdeveloped due to lack of clarity on regulatory issues: “The major challenges facing the REITs industry in Nigeria include restrictive legislation, poor knowledge and understanding of the industry in addition to prolonged bottlenecks created by the Land Use Act of 1978. Nigeria’s Land Use Act is embedded in the Constitution of our country. Thus, any attempt to rectify its inadequacies requires a constitutional amendment which of itself is a major challenge”

The speakers were at a recent conference at the Nigerian bourse to promote real estate investment trusts (REITs in Africa). It was sponsored by Stanbic IBTC Holdings Plc, FSDH Asset Management Limited, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), United Property Development Company (UPDC) Plc, Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) Nigeria Limited, Udo Udoma & Belo-Osagie and Mixta Nigeria. Click for NSE press release and photos.

RETS conference: Photo Nigerian Stock Exchange.

Conference: Pensions and Alternative Investments Africa 15-16 March

How fast-growing pensions can transform African economies

Africa’s pension and institutional savings industry is crossing the threshold into a major growth path. Channelled appropriately, they can transform Africa’s business and investment landscape and boost economies and savings.

Institutional savings – pension, insurance and other funds – are emerging as transformative forces for Africa’s economies. Industry leaders and others will discuss it at AME Trade’s Pension Funds & Alternative Investment Africa Conference (PIAFRICA), to be held in Mauritius from 15– 16 March.

The theme is “How can we leverage pension and investment funds for the development of Africa?” Pensions in 10 African countries were tallied at $379 billion in assets under management (including $322bn in South Africa). It is forecast that pension funds in the six largest sub-Saharan African markets will grow to $622bn in assets by 2020 and to $7.3 trillion by 2050.

The aim of the PIAFRICA conference is to debate whether the environment is being created for these funds to go into productive investments that will ensure their members get good returns and that contribute effectively to Africa’s growth. PIAFRICA will bring together the leaders of pension funds and institutional investors, policymakers, regulators, capital-markets, private equity and other stakeholders and is endorsed by the African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA)

Discussions will focus on maximizing Africa’s pension fund and institutional investor opportunity, and will revolve around the following topics:
• Key trends, challenges and opportunities for Africa pension funds, Insurance, mutual and social security funds
• Africa’s growing funds and their potential to develop capital markets
• How to achieve long-term benefits through investing in infrastructure and other alternative assets, including real estate
• Private equity as an investment avenue for pensions
• For and against more latitude to invest across African borders?
• Best practices for sustainable growth and trust in funds
• Capacity building and support tools
• Technology, fund administration and member services
• Country profiles: African pension funds

Top speakers confirmed to date include:

  • Doug Lacey, Partner, Leapfrog Investments
  • Eric Fajemisin, Chief Executive, Stanbic IBTC Pension Managers
  • Mr PK Kuriachen, Chief Executive, Financial Services Commission
  • Ernest Thompson, Director General, Social Security & National Insurance Trust
  • Krishen Sukdev, CEO, Government Pensions Administration Agency
  • Richard Arlove, CEO, Abax Services

For more visit http://ametrade.org/piafrica/. For media accreditation and interviews contact Barbora Kuckova, Marketing Manager, AME Trade Ltd, Tel: +44 207 700 4949 Email: barbora@ametrade.org

Africa IPO round-up

A roundup of some recent initial public offers (IPOs) of shares on Africa’s stock exchanges to raise capital

In early October, MTN launched plans to sell up to 35% of shares on the Ghana Stock Exchange. Ghana’s Securities and Exchange Commission Director General Adu Anane Antwi confirmed they had started the listing process and were working on the prospectus but no timeline had been given. According to local reports, MTN received its 15-year 4G licence in 2015 after spending $67.5m and on condition that it lists. It hopes to raise up to $500m.
MTN Nigeria is also working on plans for an initial public offer (IPO) of shares on the Nigerian Stock Exchange in 2017 which could raise up to $1bn. Nigeria is among several African governments encouraging telcos to list on local bourses and listing is among conditions to settle a record NGN330bn ($1.1bn) fine for failing to disconnect 5.1m unregistered subscribers. Nigeria contributes a third of sales and profit for the Africa’s biggest phone company, which is listed in Johannesburg with market capitalization of ZAR212.8bn ($15.3bn) in early October.
Listings and capital-raising momentum has been maintained on the Nairobi Securities Exchange. Deacons Kenya is the first listed fashion retailer, after joining the Alternative Investment Market Segment (AIMS) of the NSE on 2 August. CEO Muchiri Wahome said the extra funds were to fund expansion into towns with “a vibrant middle class” across Kenya, spurred Kenya’s rapid and ambitious devolution and setting up 47 counties under its 2010 Constitution. Deacons is also eyeing opportunities in neighbouring Rwanda and Uganda. It will also help existing shareholders who want to sell. The retailer listed about 123m shares at an opening price of KES15 ($0.15) each, but by early October the price had slumped to KES8.55.

 

Nairobi centre (credit www.kenya-advisor.com)

Nairobi centre (credit www.kenya-advisor.com)

In June, leather and shoe retailer Nairobi Business Ventures, which operates the brand KShoe, had become the fifth listing on the NSE’s Growth and Enterprise Market Segment aimed at smaller businesses. It was listed through introduction and valued at KES118m ($1.2m). Previous 2016 share issues included Longhorn Publishers in May. In June power generator Kengen succeeded in the Kenyan bourse’s largest rights issue, raising KES26.4bn ($262.1m) by offering 4.4bn new shares at KES6.55 each, with a 92% subscription rate. Kengen has projects to generate another 700MW of power, of which 605MW is geothermal.
However, Fusion Capital had to cancel its IPO despite extending twice after only getting 38% uptake and four investors for its KES2.3bn offering and failing to meet the minimum threshold.
The Johannesburg Stock Exchange had its second private equity listing. Universal Partners raised R1.3bn ($93.7m) in an IPO which was only open for 4-5 August and started trading on the Alt-X market on 11 August. The company was registered in Mauritius in April and also listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius. Its mandate is to invest in properties across Europe, at £10m-£30m ($12m-$37m) each and it aims to start investing within six months. The IPO was for 72m shares at R18.07 each. Several companies aiming to raise capital for African and international investments have dual-listing on the Mauritius and Johannesburg exchanges.
Liberty Holdings is likely to follow up its Kenyan IPO success with a South African Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) called Liberty Two Degrees in December. This will include some ZAR6bn of its existing portfolio, including iconic malls around Gauteng, and ZAR4bn of new money. As in Kenya, the property investments are managed by Stanlib.
West Africa’s integrated regional stock exchange, Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM), based in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, plans to build a platform for listing mining shares and raising capital locally. The exchange is talking with Canada’s Toronto Stock Exchange (TMX Group), a favourite bourse for early-stage mining entrepreneurs. BRVM General Manager Edoh Kossi Amenounve says it could open by 2018 and will be for companies exploring or operating mines in the region. There is likely to be a waiver to the usual requirement for 2 years of trading history. The BRVM links eight West African countries, including gold exporters Mali, Burkina Faso and Côte d’Ivoire, and fourth-largest uranium producer, Niger.
Egypt’s Minister of Investment Dalia Korshid says the Government aims to raise up to $10bn over the next three to five years with IPOs of government-owned companies in the oil sector but will start with restructuring state-owned electricity companies.

Africa’s best real estate developer is private equity group Actis

Leading African private equity group Actis has won the title for “Best Developer in Africa” in the 8th annual global Euromoney Real Estate Survey run by finance magazine Euromoney. To collect data for the award, Euromoney was canvassing the opinions of senior real-estate bankers, developers, investment managers, corporate end-users and advisory firms in over 70 countries since March. It was the biggest Euromoney real estate poll with over 1,900 responses. Actis invests mainly in retail and office developments in high-growth markets such as Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia. It launched its first real estate fund in 2006 and concentrates on institutional quality investments. It is sub-Saharan Africa’s most experienced private equity real estate investor and developer, according to a press release.

Current Actis developments include Ghana’s first green-certified building One Airport Square in Accra; East Africa’s biggest retail centre Garden City in Nairobi, and Ikeja City Mall in Lagos which welcomed 45,000 people on its first day of trading in December 2011. Past investments include Accra Mall in Accra and The Junction in Nairobi.

According to the press release, David Morley, Head of Real Estate at Actis, said: “Sub-Saharan Africa has a population of 800 million people and is the fastest urbanising region in the world; an increasingly sophisticated consumer class seek places to live, eat, shop and relax in the face of chronic undersupply. There is tremendous opportunity for those who take up the challenge and we are very proud to see our work recognised in this way.” Euromoney Editor Clive Horwood said, “The winners of this year’s Euromoney survey are those that exhibited the ability to innovate and make best use of the inherent strengths of their organisation. In Africa, in particular, there are great opportunities for those companies best equipped to operate in challenging markets. Through the Euromoney real estate survey, the market has recognised Actis as the leader in this field.”

Nairobi’s Garden City
In July Actis confirmed its investment in Nairobi’s Garden City, a 32-acre mixed use development on the recently expanded 8-lane Thika Highway. This will be a 50,000 sqm retail mall, with commercial premises, 500 new homes and a 4-acre central park, offering family friendly leisure space for Kenyans and visitors to the city. The park will also house an outdoor events arena for the staging of concerts and shows. Groundbreaking is due in December 2012 and completion targeted for May 2014, according to a press release.

Actis is working with leading retailers, including a flagship store for South Africa’s Game, their first in Kenya. Letting is underway with specialist agents Knight Frank Kenya and Broll in South Africa. There are detailed discussions with other foreign retailers looking to enter the rapidly-expanding Kenyan market, such as South African fashion group, Foschini. There is a strong focus on environmental features and the aim is to achieve the first LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for a retail mall in East Africa. This brings down operating costs for tenants by reducing electricity and water consumption.

Accra Mall sold
In May Actis confirmed that it had sold its 85% shareholding in Ghana’s Accra Mall to South Africa’s commercial and retail property developer Atterbury and financial services group Sanlam. Actis managed the development process, invested the equity and raised the debt to finance the project, working in partnership with renowned Ghanaian entrepreneurs, the Owusu-Akyaw family. The mall opened its doors in July 2008 fully let, and attracts 135,000 shoppers each week, according to a press release.

Accra Mall is Ghana’s first A-grade shopping and leisure centre, home to international brands such as Shoprite and Game, as well as Ghanaian brands including Kiki Clothing and Nallem. The trade sale demonstrates an increasing interest in Ghana by foreign investors and also reflects the acute demand for high quality real estate assets in sub-Saharan Africa.

Actis 100% owned
Also in May, Actis said it had bought the UK Government’s remaining 40% shareholding in the company. In the deal announced on 1 May, the government will receive a cash payment of US$13m (£8m) and will participate in future profits as Actis’s investments are realised over the next decade. To date, Actis has invested £1.7bn on behalf of the UK government’s direct finance institution CDC and has returned £3.1bn to CDC and by extension the British taxpayer.

Paul Fletcher, Senior Partner at Actis, said: “When Actis opened for business in 2004 our purpose was to attract private capital to countries that were dependent on aid and to legitimise them as investment destinations. Over the last eight years our work in Africa, Asia and Latin America, investing in over 70 companies employing 113,000 people, has shown what is possible. Successive governments have shown real vision backing a private sector model like Actis. We are pleased that HMG has realised the value of their decision to support Actis from the start. We look forward to continuing our work, investing in high quality companies in high growth countries and delivering strong returns for our investors.”

JSE growth board AltX scores 100th listing with Osiris

The 100th company listed on the AltX growth capital board of South Africa’s JSE Ltd securities exchange this week. According to spokesperson Nicole Cheyne: “More than R1.25-billion (USD151.9 million) has been raised via this market,” since AltX was launched in 2003.
The latest listing, on 20 August, is Bermuda-based Osiris Properties International. Osiris’ primary listing is on the Bermuda Stock Exchange. According to a press release from the JSE, it offers investors a high-yielding property investment by acquiring quality undervalued property assets predominantly in the UK and Europe. CEO Peter Todd said “Osiris Properties presents an attractive opportunity for South African investors. Our secondary listing on AltX further enhances the company’s ability to raise capital.”
This was the AltX’s third listing this year, and the weak global economy is blamed for drops in listings both on AltX and the JSE main board, but Cheyne said this is expected to improve. Of the 100 listings, 21 had successfully transferred to the JSE’s main board and 16 had delisted, leaving 63 companies currently listed on AltX. Industrials are the biggest segment by number of companies, but financials constitute 46% of the overall market capitalization of over R12.5-billion.
Also on Monday, financial services company Prescient Holdings listed on the JSE main board via a reverse listing into PBT Group (previously Prescient Business Technologies).

Source: JSE Ltd press release.

Emerging Capital Partners (ECP) awarded “Best Private Equity House in Africa”

Emerging Capital Partners (www.ecpinvestments.com) has won an award as “Best Private Equity House in Africa” named by EMEA Finance magazine (www.emeafinance.com). This recognizes ECP’s achievements in raising over $613 million for its third pan-African fund, ECP Africa III (AF III), making it the largest fund ever raised for growth equity investing across Africa. It brings ECP’s total assets under management to $1.8 billion.
ECP is praised for committing over $1 billion to diverse investments across all of Africa and impacting growth and development in over 40 countries. It is the second consecutive year ECP won the award.
Hurley Doddy, a founding partner and Co-CEO of ECP said in a press release: “We are extremely proud to receive the award for “Best Private Equity House in Africa” for a second consecutive year. Africa’s profile as a compelling investment story has accelerated in pace over the last two years, so we feel ever more privileged to be held up as the leading firm among our many excellent peers.
“The fact that we were able to raise over $613 million during a time of great financial uncertainty proves that we are certainly not alone in believing in Africa’s potential. Our dedicated focus and extensive presence on the ground adds operational value unrivalled by our peers. We look forward to continuing our success across Africa throughout 2011 and beyond.”
Doddy told Reuters agency in an interview on 7 March that Africa offers plenty of scope for private equity investments, with at least another decade of strong growth expected from consumer goods, broadband internet and financial services. After years of explosive growth in cell phones and banking, he foresees the new growth sectors will also include TV over Internet, insurance and real estate.
Recently, ECP has deployed over $180 million from AF III in 4 investments which provide new services and increase opportunity in 17 countries: Financial Bank, a Togo-based commercial bank with operations in Benin, Cameroon, Gabon, Chad, Mauritania and Guinea; Wananchi Group, a high-speed Internet provider serving Kenya and Tanzania; Groupe NSIA, a West African company providing insurance to Benin, Togo, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Ghana, Mali, Guinea, Cameroon, Congo and Gabon; and Thunnus Overseas Group, a leading canned tuna provider supplying France with over 25% of its canned tuna products from bases in Madagascar and Cote d’Ivoire.
The group has already made more than 50 investments and 20 successful exits in Africa. Past investments include Nigerian wireless network operator Starcomms and pan-African mobile operator Celtel International, sold to Kuwait’s MTC for $3.4 billion in 2005 before MTNCI was rebranded Zain last year and its African assets were bought by Bharti Airtel. Doddy told Reuters: “Those companies are now quite big. The rates of growth are declining so we’ve been getting out of our last investments in that segment of the telecom business, looking maybe to get in some other segments,” he said.
One such example is Kenya’s Wananchi, a triple-play telecoms firm which bundles broadband internet, cable television and voice telephony into one package and is rolling out its services to 9 east African countries. “A country like Kenya may be over 50% in terms of cell phone penetration but Pay TV, broadband are still at the 1% and 2% type range, so once again we probably have another decade of growth in that type of business,” Doddy said.
He saw further growth in Nigeria’s banking sector, a favourite of frontier market investors, and predicted financial services including insurance would also generate high returns. Changes in land ownership laws would also allow lucrative real estate investments and growth in mortgage lending. Soaring food prices in recent quarters meant investors were increasingly interested in Africa’s agricultural potential, with swathes of arable land that could be put to more productive use. “We’ve seen a real uptake in people looking at agro-businesses here.”
Popular uprisings in North Africa might slow investment in the short term but could unlock the region’s economic potential in future. “Those places had been held back by governance that needed to be changed…I think it is reasonable to expect higher growth rates in North Africa if you look over the next decade.”
He said there was increased interest from Chinese and Indian investors but viewed these as potential co-investors or exit opportunities rather than direct competition.
“If you have a good cash-generative business here in Africa, almost anywhere in almost in any sector, somebody is probably interested in buying,” Doddy said.
The EMEA Finance award is to be presented at annual Achievement Awards charity dinner in London in June.