Archive for the 'Malawi' Category

Malawi Stock Exchange to start automated trading in May

Malawi Stock Exchange is set to go live with an automated trading system (ATS) and today (30 April) is start date for dematerialization as shareholders move physical certificates onto the Reserve Bank of Malawi electronic Central Securities Depository (CSD). Trading on the African stock exchange is to be automated by end of May.

Malawi Stock Exchange (photo credit: The Times Malawi)

According to the announcement by MSE and RBM: “Electronic trading is expected to commence by end of May 2018 and only securities that have been transferred and registered in the CSD will be traded in the ATS. Going forward, after implementation of the systems, all new IPOs (initial public offers) and subsequent trading will be made in the CSD and the ATS, respectively.

“The CSD is commencing the dematerialization process of the existing paper certificates and therefore requires that shareholders open investor accounts and dematerialize their securities (migrating from paper-based title to electronic securities) in preparation for the trading of electronic-based securities following implementation of the systems.

“Current shareholders are consequently required to contact a registered stock broker or custodian to dematerialize their stock holdings. Stock holders will be required to complete a Stock Holding Declaration and Consent to Dematerialize form upon presentation of the physical certificates; a signed and stamped copy of the form will be provided to the holder. The dematerialization process will run from 30th April, 2018 to 30th September, 2018.

“The investing public is encouraged to open securities accounts (in the same manner that one opens a bank account) through a registered custodian or stock broker from 30th April, 2018 onwards and deposit their share certificates in such accounts. We strongly encourage investors to deposit their securities early in order to minimize inconveniences that holders may face when need to trade arises instead of waiting for the deadline. Investors in regularly trading counters are particularly encouraged to speed up the dematerialisation of the securities.”

Capizar ATS system by InfoTech
The new system is Capizar ATS supplied by InfoTech Group of Pakistan in partnership with local firm Unified Technologies Ltd for infrastructure, also supplying hardware for MSE. Amir Raza Khan, VP & Head of Capital Markets BU at InfoTech, commented in a press announcement: “It is a privilege to work and represent Pakistan on an international platform. We are extremely proud of the expansion InfoTech has made in African markets especially in the SADC region. I would like to congratulate the Reserve Bank of Malawi and wish them success in this new era of automated trading and hope this new direction will influence a rise in aggregate turnover as well as volumes traded.”

The project is part of the $28.2 million Financial Sector Technical Assistance Project funded by a World Bank loan, with the total project set to close on 29 June. The tender was advertised by RBM in November 2016 and a procurement document published by the World Bank puts the CDS cost at $399,000 and the ATS at $723,708, plus links and other costs.

$1.9 bn pensions and insurance
MSE was created in 1994 and started offering secondary market trading in Government of Malawi securities. It started trading equity in November 1996 when it listed National Insurance Company Limited (NICO). It is licensed under the Financial Services Act 2010 and operates under the Securities Act 2010 and the Companies Act 2013. CEO is John Robson Kamanga.

At 30 April there were 3 stockbrokers, and listings were 13 stocks and 2 Government of Malawi bonds. The most recent main board listing was FMBcapital Holdings in September 2017, breaking a 9-year listings drought since Telekom Networks Malawi listed in November 2008. No companies have yet listed on the Alternative Capital Market designed for smaller and medium enterprises (SMEs) to raise capital. FMBCH is based in Mauritius and is holding company for FMBcapital group with banking and financial operations in Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Reserve Bank of Malawi (RBM) Governor, Dalitso Kabambe, said the stock market has a critical role to play in development, according to local newspaper The Times. He said firms are need capital for expansion to increase output, but also funds are growing rapidly outside the stock exchange, especially in pension and life insurance assets. “It is estimated that, by next year, 2018, the country will have a combined total of pension funds and life insurance funds to the tune of MWK1.4 trillion ($1.9 billion), against a total equity at the MSE of MWK762bn ($1.0bn).

“This, if not addressed by listing more companies on the MSE, will likely cause sub-optimal asset allocation, liquidity issues and an asset bubble. We have to avoid this at all costs, and the development of a stock market is a sure way of meeting the objective,” he said.

He was also quoted in a local newspaper The Nation that the new ATS and CSD would enhance confidence for local and international investors.

Top performances for USD investors at Africa’s stock exchanges

Malawi came out as Africa’s top-performing securities exchange for USD-based investors over 2013, with a strong 62.4% return over the year to 31 December. According to data published by the excellent website, www.investinginafrica.net, 8 out of 13 African exchanges surveyed beat the 29.6% return achieved by the key US S&P 500 equity index.
Other top performers for USD investors included West Africa’s regional securities exchange Bourse Régionale des Valeurs Mobilières (BRVM) which covers 8 countries. Ghana Stock Exchange gave 44.8% return, the Nigerian Stock Exchange was close behind with 44.6% and Kenya’s Nairobi Securities Exchange scored 43.7%.
Worst performers were the Namibian Stock Exchange (-2.6%) and the South Africa’s Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) with a return of -9.3%, both strongly affected by the decline in the exchange rate of ZAR currency against USD.
Prospects for African exchanges continue to look good with many African economies expected to continue strong growth in coming years and increasing deal interest. However, changes in quantitative easing in the US could lead to cash withdrawals from emerging and frontier markets including Africa.
Liquidity is a major challenge for many exchanges, according to the data by Ryan Hoover of InvestinginAfrica. Zambia’s Lusaka stock exchange only traded $0.7million of African equities a week, while Malawi and Uganda only achieved $0.8m each and Namibia $1m. Ghana was at $3.5m a week, just behind Abidjan-based BRVM which traded $4.6m, while Mauritius managed $5.7m a week, Botswana $6.2m and the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange $8.5m. Most liquid exchanges in the list (which does not include the Egyptian Exchange) include Nairobi averaging $37.1m a week, Nigeria at $106.8m and the JSE at $3.5 billion of equity trading a week.
Although Hoover lists the Dar es Salaam SE as trading a creditable $10.7m a week, a news report in the Tanzania Daily News say turnover jumped 5 fold to TZS252.3bn ($155.9m) in 2013, up from TZS50.9bn in 2012, which is equivalent to $3m a week. The paper quotes DSE’s CEO Moremi Marwa saying: “The DSE outstanding performance demonstrates the increased activities coupled with education campaigns geared at enhancing awareness that gradually made the market more vibrant”. However, the article notes there was a single transaction for TZS78.5bn ($48.5m) in Tanzania Breweries (TBL) in the third week of December 2013 as 48 deals between the International Finance Corporation and local investors which boosted local ownership and may have influenced the figures.

For the full table, check www.investinginafrica.net here:

SADC stock exchanges work together towards links, shared skills and better visibility

The 10 stock exchanges of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) are working together to increase the effectiveness of their markets. The Committee of SADC Stock Exchanges (CoSSE) has agreed to concentrate on 6 priority areas in support of regional moves to more efficient capital markets.
The stock exchanges will explore ways to use technology to link their trading and order systems and work together to ensure clearing and settlement systems align with global standards adopted in April. They are working closely with SADC institutions to support development of regional systems, including payment and will boost visibility of trading data and enhance their joint website (www.cossesadc.org), launched in April by the JSE and I-Net Bridge. The bourses will also pool resources to accelerate training and skills development for capital markets staff.
CoSSE members are Botswana Stock Exchange, Malawi Stock Exchange, Stock Exchange of Mauritius, Bolsa de Valores de Moçambique, Namibian Stock Exchange, South Africa’s JSE Ltd, Swaziland Stock Exchange, Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange of Tanzania, Zambia’s Lusaka Stock Exchange, and the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange. They met on 25 June in Gaborone, Botswana in a meeting convened by CoSSE with support from SADC Secretariat.
“Stock exchanges have their roles cut out in each of our economies to augment our governments’ efforts to grow national economies for the greater good and as part of the SADC region’s struggle for growth to escape poverty,” says Mrs Beatrice Nkanza, Chairperson of CoSSE and CEO of the Lusaka Stock Exchange. “They are the channel for long-term risk capital, which is urgently needed for the region’s businesses, infrastructure providers and even governments. They also encourage saving and investment. CoSSE members are working closely together to support SADC initiatives and to make individual markets even more effective”.
CoSSE was set up in 1997 as a collective body of the stock exchanges in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). It promotes co-operation and collaboration between member stock exchanges and is resourced by a Secretariat, supported by the JSE. SADC defines CoSSE’s role in the Finance and Investment Protocol and other policy documents and CoSSE has links to ministerial and senior treasury bodies and also works closely with the Committee of Insurance, Securities and Non-Banking Financial Authorities (CISNA) and the Committee of Central Bank Governors (CCBG).
CoSSE had set up three working committees to implement six business plans, prioritized from the initiatives identified in its Strategic Plan 2011-2016. These are:
1. Legal and Secretariat working committee – chaired by Geoff Rothschild of the JSE. This is responsible for formalizing and resourcing the Secretariat, and for continuing and improving liaison with CISNA and other SADC organs.
2. Market Development working committee – chaired by Vipin Mahabirsingh of the Stock Exchange of Mauritius. CoSSE has been developing models for inter-connectivity between automated trading systems at some or all member exchanges. The working committee will help member exchanges ensure their clearing and settlement systems comply with new global standards and support regional initiatives.
3. Capacity-Building and Visibility working committee – chaired by Anabela Chambuca Pinho of the Bolsa de Valores de Moçambique. This will liaise with member exchanges, regulators, stockbrokers, investors and others to develop and coordinate training courses. It will also enhance the new CoSSE website, help members to upgrade their own websites and to ensure their trading data and company news are disseminated internationally.
Progress will be guided by an Executive Committee, consisting of CoSSE Chairperson Mrs Nkanza, CoSSE Vice-Chairperson Gabriel Kitua (CEO of the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange in Tanzania) and the three working committee chairpersons. The strategic plan was developed with assistance from FinMark Trust.

For more information contact
Beatrice Nkanza, CEO Lusaka Stock Exchange, tel +260 (1) 228391 or email nkanzab [at] luse.co.zm
Gabriel Kitua, CEO Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange, tel +255 22 2135779 or email gabriel.kitua [at] dse.co.tz.
Pearl Moatshe of CoSSE Secretariat, tel +27 11 5207118 or email pearlm [at] jse.co.za