Archive for the 'IPO' Category

Some African IPOs – August 2018

Uganda – CIPLA-Quality Chemicals IPO closes 24 August
CIPLA-Quality Chemicals Ltd opened its initial public offer (IPO) on 13 August and will close on 24 August, aiming to list on the Uganda Securities Exchange on 24 September. The pharmaceutical company aims to raise $45 million through offering a 18% stake via 657,179,319 shares at UGX256.50 per share, according to Reuters. The company manufactures drugs that include anti-retroviral, anti-malarial and Hepatitis B medicines and its products are sold in Cameroon, Comoros, Kenya, Namibia, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.
India’s Cipla Limited, Uganda’s Quality Chemicals and the Government of Uganda set up the company as a joint venture in 2005, and TLG Capital and Capitalworks Investment Partners invested in the company in 2009, holding stakes worth 12.50% and 14.40% respectively. Lead transaction advisor was reported to be Renaissance Capital in Kenya and Crested Capital in Uganda is the lead sponsoring broker.
it ends a 6-year listing drought as the previous IPO in Uganda was Umeme in 2012.

CIPLA-Quality Chemicals in Kampala (file photo)

Egypt – Giza Spinning & Weaving probably Q4
The IPO of garment maker Giza Spinning & Weaving is set for the fourth quarter, probably November. According to reports, the aim is to sell a 40% stake to finance investment of EGP250m ($14m) into expanded production of garments and yarn. The company employs around 4,800 and was set up in 1979. It is the biggest garment exporter in Egypt by volume and the sixth largest by dollar value, with 87% of production exported to the USA and Europe in 2017. Beltone Financial will be the global coordinator and book runner and a roadshow will run in October, according to Bloomberg.

Uganda – MTN under pressure to list
MTN Group Ltd, which has 55% of the mobile market in Uganda with about 10.9m subscribers, is seeking to renew its 10-year licence in October. Godfrey Mutabazi, executive director of Uganda’s telecom regulator, says that selling shares on the local bourse isn’t a pre-condition for the granting of a new 10-year contract, but Uganda wants “Ugandans to be part of the company,” according to this Bloomberg report.

MTN Ghana – IPO closed 31 July
The IPO of Scancom PLC, the name of telco MTN in Ghana, closed on 31 July as par of bids for a local licence. It was selling 35% of the company, in line with discussions with the regulator. Details are to be announced soon and trading could begin from 5 September. It is set to be the largest listing on the Ghana Stock Exchange and shares could also be bought using the MoMo Wallet mobile-money platform. MTN has more than 221m customers across 22 markets in Africa and the Middle East. It had agreed with telecom regulators in Ghana and Nigeria to list its local units, and the offer was set to raise GHS3.5bn ($725m).

MTN Nigeria “not yet applied”
MTN had not yet applied for a listing by 9 July, according to a news report which quoted the Securities and Exchange Commission. Previously it had been reported that the listing could go live in August, when Reuters reported on pre-IPO documents in February 2018. It said that MTN planned to list by July and raise at least $400m to cut debt in its Nigeria unit, which was valued at $5.23bn. The Nigerian pledge to list cwas part of a settlemetn whcih also included a $1bn fine in 2016.

Airtel – London or Johannesburg in 2019
Airtel is reported to be aiming to raise up to $1.5bn by listing 25% of the equity in its Africa unit in early 2019, according to this report on Bloomberg, as part of plans to reduce its debt by $4.6bn over three years. Airtel is India’s top wireless operator. It also was reported to be planning to sell part of its stake in a $14.6bn company owning tower infrastructure, formed when Bharti Infratel Ltd merges with Indus Towers Ltd. It is owned by billionaire Sunil Mittal and is hoping to keep its Moody’s credit rating at Baa3. It sold about 8,300 towers in 7 African countries for some $1.7bn in 2015 and in 2016 sold its towers in Tanzania for $179m and sold its Burkina Faso and Sierra Leone units for some $1bn the same year. In 2010 it paid an enterprise valuation of $10.7bn for the African assets of Kuwait Mobile Telecommunications Co, also known as Zain.

Kenya – National Oil Corporation aims at Nairobi and London in 2019
The Government of Kenya plans to raise up to KES103bn ($1bn from a dual listing of shares in state-owned National Oil Corporation in Nairobi and London, according to this news report in Business Daily. NOC needs the money to exercise its rights to buy back shares before production at the Turkana oil field, discovered in 2012.
Petroleum principal secretary Andrew Kamau told the Business Daily that the contract for the concession of oil blocks in the Turkana oil fields to existing operators has a clause allowing the government to exercise a back-in right, which essentially means buying back a percentage of the ownership before production kicks in. “When you sign a contract you have a right to buy back some share, before production. The percentage we can buy back is 15 in one block and 20 in the other. The listing should raise enough money for the purchase,” said Mr Kamau, without indicating whether the State would exercise its rights for the entire stake under the clause. The two blocks are owned by British firm Tullow (50%), Africa Oil (25% and Total (25%). The Government and Tullow was to start small scale crude production of about 2,000 barrels a day in 2018, with full production due from 2021 after building a $2.1bn pipeline to Lamu on the coast, according to Reuters.

London – Intercement delays to 2019
Intercement is to delay its $1.8 billion IPO on the London Stock Exchange from the second half of 2018 to early 2019, according to reports. It makes cement and related products in Brazil, Portugal, Argentina, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Paraguay, South Africa and Egypt and was founded in 2008.

For fuller analysis of recent and upcoming IPOs across Africa, see the website of the Enko Africa Private Equity Fund, a $63.4m fund focused on pre-IPO opportunities across Africa.

Africa-focused Vivo Energy soars after £548m IPO on London SE

Africa’s £1.98 billion ($2.68bn) megalisting Vivo Energy (VVO) soared in its first 2 days of trading on the London Stock Exchange (dual-listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange) at the close of last week. After a successful initial public offer (IPO) of shares at 165.00 pence per share for 323.3 million shares, 27.7% of the company, it listed on the LSE on 10 May and traded up 11% on Thursday to 183.20p, before soaring as high as 198.10p on Friday 11 May and then closing at 185.0p.

Vivo raised £548m ($742m) in the share offer, which was the largest UK-listed African IPO since 2005, when Telecom Egypt raised about £650m, and the biggest IPO in London so far this year.

It listed on the Premium Segment of the LSE Main Market. Global coordinators of the deal were Citigroup, Credit Suisse and JP Morgan.

According to the LSE press release, Christian Chammas, CEO of Vivo Energy: “We have been extremely pleased with the investor response to our offer, in what has been a challenging period for the wider markets. Vivo Energy’s differentiated business model, strong track record, exposure to Africa and the growth opportunity it represents has been well understood by investors. We are excited about the momentum in the business and are looking forward to delivering further growth and success as a London listed company.”

In an article in Financial Times Chammas described Vivo as offering international investors exposure to a diverse group of mostly fast-growing African economies with rapidly expanding urban populations: “We are at the heart of the growth story, the growth of Africa’s population and consumer demand.”

Vivo is a retailer and marketer of Shell-branded fuels and lubricants in Africa, operating about 1,800 service stations across 15 African countries, with Morocco its biggest market. It is expanding fast, and is second in Africa after Total. It is owned 55% by oil trader Vitol Group SA of Switzerland, and 44% by private equity group Helios Investment Partners and 1% by management. Last year earnings before interest, depreication and amortization (EBITDA) was $326m. In December it announced a ZAR3.5bn ($256m) share swap transaction with Engen, South African unit of Malaysia’s Petroliam Nasional Bhd, which would add 9 more countries and 300 more service stations, which was awaiting regulatory approval.

According to another article in the Financial Times: “People close to the deal said that investor appetite was strong and the listing was more than two times subscribed. The transaction could unlock other African-focused IPOs that had been waiting until a company successfully tested the market.”

Nigeria’s Dangote Cement, which operates across more than 10 African countries, could be planning to raise between $1.2bn and $2bn by floating 10%-15% of the business, according to chairman Aliko Dangote. In May it announced the appointment of non-executive directors Mick Davis (former Xstrata chief executive) and Cherie Blair (lawyer and wife of former UK prime minister Tony Blair).

Another potential large African listing on the London Stock Exchange in 2018 is Liquid Telecom, which describes itself as: “the leading independent data, voice and IP provider in eastern, central and southern Africa. It supplies fibre optic, satellite and international carrier services to Africa’s largest mobile network operators, ISPs and businesses of all sizes. It also provides payment solutions to financial institutions and retailers, as well as award winning data storage and communication solutions to businesses.”

In March Africa-focused mobile phone tower firm Helios Towers, dropped plans for an IPO because of weak investor appetite. Regional rival Eaton Towers had also been considering a listing.

Vivo Energy (photo credit Vitol)

London Stock Exchange financing African growth

African companies listed or trading on the London Stock Exchange have a total market capitalization of over $200 billion ($271bn), and in the last 10 years have raised more than $16 bn on London’s markets. The 108 African companies is more than any other international market, according to a press release from the LSE.

There are 9 African sovereign bonds listed in London, from: Gabon, Ghana, Namibia, Nigeria and Zambia

According to Tom Attenborough, Head of International Business Development, London Stock Exchange, in an LSE press release: “The success of Vivo Energy’s IPO is a strong statement of international investor interest in building exposure to Africa. As a London-listed company, Vivo Energy, will gain access to the world’s most international market, as well as an unrivalled source of deep liquidity and new investors.

“London is a strong partner to African companies seeking to attract international investment.”

Paternoster Square with London Stock Exchange at right (credit: Wikipedia)

  • Also this month, May 2018, Angola launched a $3bn Eurobond on LSE, the country’s biggest international bond and the first international issuance since 2015.
  • In April the LSE Group, the Nairobi Securities Exchange and non-governmental organization FSD Africa signed a memorandum of understanding to explore the launch of LSEG’s business support and capital-raising programme, ELITE. In May, the first Kenyan company, Olsuswa Energy, joined the programme. So far 850 companies have joined the ELITE programme.
  • In November 2017, the LSE, Casablanca Stock Exchange and the Bourse Régionale des Valeurs Mobilières (BRVM) signed an agreement to roll out ELITE across West African markets, in a signing ceremony presided by Amadou Gon Coulibaly, Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire.
  • In June 2017, Nigeria raised $300m through its first Diaspora Bond on LSE, a retail bond aimed at Nigeria’s global expatriate community seeking to invest in their home country’s development. It was the first bond of its kind from sub-Saharan Africa.
  • In March 2017, LSE published its first “Companies to Inspire Africa” report, identifying hundreds of the fastest-growing and most dynamic private businesses across Africa. Vivo Energy is the first company in that report to follow up by listing on LSE.
  • In March 2016, LSEG established an Africa Advisory Group, bringing together 12 distinguished business leaders, policymakers and investors from across Africa, to discuss the challenges and opportunities presented by the development of the continent’s capital markets.
  • In November 2014, London Stock Exchange Group and The Nigerian Stock Exchange signed a capital markets agreement to support African companies seeking dual listings in London and Lagos. The agreement followed the implementation earlier in 2014 of a unique new cross-border settlement process between the UK and Nigeria.
  • In June 2014, LSEG signed a strategic agreement with Casablanca Stock Exchange to share its expertise on the full exchange business chain, from listing to trading, and from clearing to settlement and custody with a commitment to position Casablanca’s capital markets and financial infrastructure as a regional hub.
  • In April 2014, Nigerian oil and gas group Seplat was the first Nigerian company to simultaneously dual list equity shares in London and Nigeria and raised $500m in an IPO.

LSEG market infrastructure technology, supplied by Millennium IT of Sri Lanka, is deployed in more 12 African markets, including Botswana, Casablanca, Namibia and Johannesburg stock exchanges.

Will Brexit impact Africa-focused IPOs?

CONTRIBUTED POST

Brexit, the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, is having a global ripple effect as countries prepare to deal with the effects. Many African countries enjoy a close trading relationship with the UK. The United Nation’s Africa Renewal states Brexit will be a difficult time for Africa as the UK will no longer be able to help shape and lead some of its most important initiatives in the continent. Trade agreements usually take a long time to finalize, and the uncertainty of the UK economy could complicate things further for the African continent. Will Brexit affect initial public offerings (IPOs) in Africa?

While Brexit will have an impact on African businesses, the prospects for the continent look bright due to partnerships with other trading partners. For example South Africa is only one example of a country with excellent existing trade agreements with the EU, which will mitigate the effects, according to BusinessTech. Although the City in London is a key source of finance and financial support, there may be more interest to look at European partners in future when launching IPOs within the continent.

Brexit could also have a positive impact on Africa-focused IPOs with the UK pivoting away from the EU and refocusing their trade in Africa. UK Trade Commissioner for Africa Emma Wade-Smith spoke to African Business magazine of how African and UK trade relations are strong, and that Brexit means “[that] this is an exciting time to explore what this means for us [the UK] in Africa.” She noted that one area the UK was focusing on was oil.

Impact of Brexit on Africa-focused oil IPOs

Vivo Energy Investments B.V., a licensee of Royal Dutch Shell PLC in Africa, announced plans to launch an IPO that would increase the value of the company to over $3 billion, and recently confirmed it would be a premium London listing in May. The large investment shows that despite the economic turmoil predicted because of Brexit, there is still a lot of international interest in Africa. The Vivo Energy IPO represented a boost in Africa’s economic growth, a rebounding of the commodity prices, and a growing middle class, which will increase retail and fuel demand.

Africa’s oil industry has continued to grow. Economists agree that an increase in oil demand would also mean an uptrend for the commodity’s stocks. FXCM asserts that the correlation between oil and stocks isn’t always negative, as there are studies that prove that there’s no solid relationship between the inverse price movements of oil and stocks. When oil prices rise, so too do the stocks of companies that export or produce the fossil fuel. With Africa’s middle class increasing, this will have a positive knock-on affect on oil demand. Brexit could mean that the UK will be looking to increase its oil trade with Africa, which in turn will increase the number of oil IPOs being launched in the continent.

Other IPO issuers in Africa

In a previous article at African Capital Markets News, it was reported that African issuers raised approximately $1.4bn in IPOs in 2017.

This shows that Africa has many options apart from the UK if Brexit should have a negative effect on trading. While trade agreements may take a long time to finalize, and disrupt current deals with the UK, African businesses will still thrive through IPOs that are being launched by international companies within the region.

Brexit will have an impact of the African economy, but African-focused IPOs are coming from other trading partners and should not be affected by the UK’s vote to leave the EU.

Credit Pixabay.com

African issuers raise $1.4bn in IPO share offers in 2017

African share issuers have raised $1,379 million ($1.4bn) in 2017 through initial public offers (IPOs) of shares, compared to $1,154m ($1.2bn) in 2016, the second year of increase. However, the number of domestic African IPOs was down to 7, compared to 15 in 2016. The number of cross-border IPOs in Africa was 2 in each year.

The research was released today (15 December) in the latest Global Cross-Border Index from law firm Baker McKenzie. African issuers raised a total of 19.5% more capital in 2017 through IPOs was up 19.5% on 2016. Worldwide, issuers have increased IPO activity by 44% to $206.6bn and there were 1,694 new listings, up 31%.

Swiss issuers accounted for both cross-border IPOS in Africa in 2017. Aspire Global Plc listed on the Nasdaq First North Exchange, raising $38.96m, and Rainbow Rare Earths Ltd raised $8.22m when it listed on the London Stock Exchange. The total they raised was $47m, compared to $246m raised through cross-border IPOs in 2016.

Wildu du Plessis, Partner and Head of Africa at Baker McKenzie in Johannesburg, commented in a press release: “Africa’s uneven FDI (foreign direct investment) picture reflects the global uncertainty, but local challenges aggravate the unevenness.

“IPO activity is highly dependent on political and economic instability, particularly in the key markets of South Africa, Kenya, and Nigeria. In 2016, more FDI flowed to the hub economies, with new East and West Africa clusters emerging. This trend also dominated in 2017, and while South Africa has the most attractive exchange for issuances, the new clusters are shaping up to drive the IPO landscape going forward.”

“African economies have also engaged in repricing. The most tangible manifestation of this repricing has been rapid fall in some currencies as export revenues slid. This has created shortages of foreign exchange. The currency slide, has in turn, led to an increase in consumer prices, which impacted the retail, logistics, and other consumer-oriented sectors. Currency falls, however, can also create longer-term opportunities, because assets become cheaper,” he said.

Du Plessis added that he expected in coming years that more governments across Africa will privatize state-owned entities through listings, this would boost development of regulatory frameworks. In turn this will inspire market confidence in African bourses. Privatizations can be partial or full.

“In addition, removing barriers to cross-border investments through regional integration, would harmonize regulations and increase cross-border investments. This would provide more choices of financial products for investors in future,” he noted.

Global IPOs

According to Baker McKenzie, worldwide IPO volumes in 2017 reached the highest level since 2007. Momentum built through the year with an acceleration in both volume and value of capital raised in the second half. In total, 1,694 companies raised $206.6bn from IPOs, a jump of around a third in both value and volume on 2016. Both cross-border and domestic activity grew.

Cross-border deals jumped by 60% in volume, growing in all regions, including Latin America, which saw its first cross-border listing in 10 years. However, growth in cross-border capital was once again outpaced by growth in domestic capital raising, which rose 55% in value. This led to a slight decline in Baker McKenzie’s Global Cross-Border Index.

Koen Vanhaerents, Global Head of Capital Markets at Baker McKenzie, commented: “The IPO market in 2017 has put in its best performance in 10 years. A more stable political environment in some of the key markets, combined with strong economic growth, has boosted both the number of listings and the volume of capital raised.”

“With key risks to the global economic outlook easing, we expect IPOs to hit a new post-financial crisis high in 2018,” he added. “We recently forecast that domestic IPO activity will continue to rise, to a peak of over $220bn in 2018.”

About: “Baker McKenzie helps clients overcome the challenges of competing in the global economy. We solve complex legal problems across borders and practice areas. Our unique culture, developed over 65 years, enables our 13,000 people to understand local markets and navigate multiple jurisdictions, working together as trusted colleagues and friends to instil confidence in our clients (www.bakermckenzie.com).

Innovative African IPO and listing successes show strong demand

Here is a round-up of recent initial public offers (IPOs) and other listings of shares on African Stock Exchanges, many of them over-subscribed. Namibia has scored its first listing of a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), while Mauritius is the home for an innovative listing of Afreximbank GDRs and of 2 primary listings on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange.

Namibia: Nimbus Infrastructure Limited is first SPAC vehicle
Nimbus Infrastructure Limited listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX) via private placement and started trading on 6 October. It raised more than N$100 million ($7m) from local investment institutions and retail investors. It aims to invest into information, computer and telecommunications (ICT) projects and institutions in sub-Saharan Africa.

It is Namibia’s first listed capital pool company (CPC). This is a type of company, also known as a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), is most popular in the USA or Canada and South Africa’s Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) has listed several SPACs.

The company has no commercial operations or assets, except cash. It uses its cash to evaluate promising investments and once it has invested in a viable business, usually within a set timeframe, it continues to operate as a conventional listed company. The funds are kept in an escrow account and are released on approval by shareholders or in line with a pre-approved spending budget, according to the company website. It must also comply with the Corporate Governance Code for Namibia (NamCode).

The private placement was open from 15-29 September. The listing of Nimbus was a joint initiative between Cirrus Capital, Paratus Namibia and Cronje and Company.

According to the company, it “is currently looking at a number of potential transactions and as per the stock exchange rules, aims to take these transactions forward for shareholder approval before the end of the year.” Nimbuas has signed a management agreement with Paratus.

According to an NSX statement, reported in Namibian Economist: “The Nimbus listing boasts exciting opportunities for Namibia, as not only does it focus on the fast-growing ICT sector across the continent, but in so doing, it offers a strong diversification opportunity for the funds of institutions and individuals alike, allowing diversified jurisdiction, currency and sector returns for investors. Further to this, as Namibia’s first CPC, Nimbus represents an opportunity to prove a new concept that will likely form a critical part of the future development of the Namibian real and financial sectors”.

Côte d’Ivoire: Ecobank Cote d’Ivoire
Ecobank Cote d’Ivoire launched a share offer on 27 September and closed it the same day as it was already twice oversubscribed. The IPO was to sell 20.44% of the bank’s shareholding in the form of 2,250,000 shares at XOF20,000 per share, raising XOF45bn (USD79.5m).

The bank is set to list on the Bourse Régionale des Valeurs Mobilières (BRVM) in December, where it will join parent company Ecobank Transnational Incorporated (ETI), a leading share on the BRVM, the Nigerian Stock Exchang and the Ghana Stock Exchanghe.

The offer, organized by stockbrokers EDC Investment Corporation and Hudson & Cie had been scheduled to run from 22 September to 11 October. It was 2.2x oversubscribed on the first day.

According to Enko Capital “Ecobank Cote d’Ivoire was created in 1989 following the acquisition of Chase Manhattan Bank. The bank has since expanded to become the third largest lender in Ivory Coast with a market share of 10.5% in terms of loans and 11.7% in terms of deposits and employs 648 people across 53 branches holding 274,018 accounts.

“Prior to the IPO, ETI held a 94.26% stake in Ecobank Cote d’Ivoire and this will reduce to 75% post listing. ETI was founded in Togo in 1985 and currently has a presence in 36 African countries. The banking group is listed on three exchanges in Africa.. Its stock is owned by more than 600,000 shareholders and the group employs over 17,000 people across 1,200 branches and offices. Ecobank Cote d’Ivoire is the third largest contributor to ETI’s group revenue after Ecobank Nigeria and Ecobank Ghana.”

Namibia: Letshego Holdings
Letshego Holdings Namibia had to extend its IPO by 4 days to 26 September and drop its offer price from NAD4.70 to NAD3.80 per share, according to Enko Capital: “The main purpose of the IPO was to satisfy the Bank of Namibia’s conditions for granting a banking license to Letshego Bank Namibia in 2016 which require a minimum 45% local ownership within a four year period.”

Letshego listed on 28 September on the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX)with a market capitlaization of NAD1.9 billion, according to a report in New Era and a press release.

Finance Minister Calle Schlettwein did not have a warm view of capital markets as he celebrated the listing: “’With this listing Letshego has taken a dive into the shark pool, but this is a well-prepared dive that you were truly prepared for”.

Over 3,600 qualifying applications were received during the 4-week offer, with individuals and non-institutional investors making up NAD40m of the total NAD180m raised.

NSX CEO Tiaan Bazuin said: “I am extremely pleased with the successful listing of Letshego. There has been a lot of talk about localization in the Namibian market and this listing shows the best way, in my mind, to achieve this goal.”

Letshego Namibia is an offshoot of Letshego Holdings Limited, listed on the Botswana Stock Exchange, which has reduced its holding from 85% to 79%. Letshego Bank Namibia has had a full licence since July 2016, and is a 100% subsidiary of Letshego Holdings Namibia. Its origin in 2002 was as Edu Loan Namibia, making salary loans, and in 2008 Letshego bought majority shareholding.

Mauritius – Afeximbank global depositary receipts
African Export-Import Bank (Afreximbank), headquartered in Egypt, raised more than its $100m minimum target after selling global depositary receipts (GDRs) backed by its Class D shares. The GDRs listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius was on 4 October. The minimum investment for the offer was $30,000 and it closed on 22 September.

Afreximbank is a supranational trade finance bank established in October 1993. Class A shareholders consist of African States, African central banks and African public institutions; Class B shareholders are African financial institutions and African private investors; Class C shareholders are non-African investors, such as international banks and export credit agencies; while Class D shareholders can be any investors.

South Africa: African Rainbow Capital Investments
This newly formed company listed on the main board of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange on 7 September, the 12th listing to date in 2017. It raised ZAR4.0bn ($282m) and brought the total capital raised on the JSE in the year to date to ZAR76bn ($54bn), according to this JSE press release.

ARC Investments is a capital raising and investment entity incorporated in Mauritius which will offer shareholders the opportunity to invest in a permanently broad-based black controlled investment entity holding a diversified portfolio of investments. The initial investment portfolio held by ARC Investments will be seeded by African Rainbow Capital Proprietary Limited (ARC), which will remain the majority shareholder in ARC Investments.

Shareholders invest alongside ARC in the initial portfolio of 16 investments in financial services including: Alexander Forbes Limited, Alexander Forbes Group Limited, Indwe Broker Holdings, Senayo Securities and Santam and and 17 non-financial services including investments in agriculture and food production, building and construction, energy, information technology and telecommunications, investment holding companies and real estate businesses. Its most significant investment is a 20% interest in Multisource Telecoms Proprietary Limited, currently trading as Rain. According to Reuters, ARC Investments is valued at ZAR8.5bn, and has 3 cornerstone investors including Singapore’s GIC Pte Ltd, the Public Investment Corporation and Sanlam Private Wealth.

ARC is a majority black-owned investment holding company which seeks to utilize its empowerment credentials, strong balance sheet and the track record of its leadership and brand to invest in financial services distribution businesses. ARC is wholly owned by Ubuntu-Botho Investments (UBI), which was created in 2003.

Patrice Motsepe, Chairman of both Ubuntu Botho Investments and ARC, said: “the listing of ARC Investments on the JSE is a major step towards realising one of the key objectives of ARC, namely to build a world class broad- based black – controlled investment entity for all South Africans.”

Nemer says the JSE is equally proud to help ARC Investments facilitate its goal of providing investment exposure for the public to B-BBEE assets, which are often only held privately.

South Africa – Steinhoff Africa Retail (STAR)

Holding company Steinhoff Africa Retail (STAR) successfully raised ZAR15.38bn (USD1.08bn) after placing 750,000,000 shares at ZAR20.50 each between 4 and 14 September. It listed on the JSE on 20 September.

It brings public shareholding to 21.7% of STAR, which was formed as part of the restructuring of the Steinhoff Group, and Steinhoff International holds 78.3%. The group has 4,808 stores in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Brands operating under the STAR group include Pep, Ackermans, Poco, Russells, Flash, Bradlows, Rochester, Buco, Timbercity, The Tile House, Incredible Connection, HiFi Corp, Dunns, John Craig, Refinery, Shoe City, Tekkie Town and Sleepmasters.

According to Enko capital, the offer was 4.8x over-subscribed.

South Africa: Brainworks
Mauritius-registered investment holding company Brainworks, with an investment base focused on hospitality, real estate, financial serice and logistics in Zimbabwe, listed on the JSE on 13 October, after an IPO from 28 September to 11 October. It is the first Zimbabwean company with a proimary listing on the JSE and the 16th listing for the year to date, according to a JSE press release, where it sought to raise ZAR316.5m (USD22.3m) through the sale of 27,523,951 shares at ZAR11.50 per share.

Brainworks was established in 2011 and holds investments including controlling stakes in 2 listed hospitality companies, African Sun and Dawn Properties, which are listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange. It also has investments in GetBucks, GetCash, GetSure, MyBucks, Skyclear and FML Logistics and says approximately 38% of revenue is generated in hard currency.

Donna Nemer, Director: Capital Markets at the JSE, says the exchange is proud to welcome Brainworks to the South African market. “As Africa’s largest stock exchange, the JSE believes we can make an important contribution to the growth and the development of our continent. We do this through offering foreign investors a secure and transparent entry point into Africa and providing the companies who do business here with a liquid platform to raise further capital to fund their expansion.”

Nemer says the JSE also favours dual- or cross-listings, wherein debt or equity is listed simultaneously on the JSE and on a local market. “This assists companies from other African countries to gain access to a much larger capital pool and trade in a more liquid environment, while still allowing local market participation.”

Thanks to research contribution by Enko Capital, which invests in African opportunities.

African IPO pipeline includes $3bn Vivo Energy

Investors have been snapping up Africa-focused IPOs (initial public offers) of shares and more capital-raisings and stock-exchange listings are in the pipeline. Biggest of the upcoming African IPOs is a reported share offer by Vivo Energy, while miner AfriTin, investment and real estate company Cytonn and property company Hystead also said to be heading for the markets.

Earlier this month, Wall Street Journal reported that Netherlands-based Vivo Energy, which is licensed to distribute Shell fuel and lubricants in 16 African countries, is working with investment banks to act as underwriters. Its offer, planned for the London Stock Exchange, could value the company at $3 billion.

Vivo Energy (photo credit Vitol Africa)


Vivo was created in 2011 after Shell sold 80% of its downstream operations in 14 African countries to Dutch firm Vitol Africa BV and private equity fund Helios Investment Partners in a deal worth $1bn and then sold the balance to them for $250 million earlier this year. Vivo operates 1,800 Shell fuel stations and sells Shell-branded products such as liquefied petroleum gas and lubricants to aviation, marine and mining in 16 markets.

AfriTin is a newly formed tin company which is acquiring the tin assets of Bushveld Minerals in Namibia and South Africa and announced plans for a £2m ($2.6m) capital raise on the AIM market operated by the London Stock Exchange. The assets will include 85% of Uis Tin Project, the former workings of Uis mine in Namibia, and assets in South Africa including Mokopane and Zaaiplaats Tin Tailings project.

Pieter Prinsloo, CEO of South African real estate investment trust (REIT) Hyprop, focused on shopping centres, said it was looking to list UK subsidiary Hystead separately on the Johannesburg and Luxembourg stock exchanges in the first half of 2018, according to this news report. Hyprop owns 60% of Hystead, which has interests in 4 malls in Montenegro, Serbia, Macedonia and Bulgaria valued at EUR460m ($535m). Hyprop listed on the JSE in 1988 and has property assets in malls in South Africa, Ghana, Zambia and Nigeria.

Kenya’s Cytonn Investment plc changed into a public company in August using a 2015 provision in the Companies Act. It said it plans to list 10m shares by introduction on the Growth Enterprise Market Segment (GEMS) of the Nairobi Securities Exchange in mid-2018. CEO Edwin Dande said on CNBC . It is not raising new capital but seeking to diversify sources of funding and increase corporate governance, transparency and accountability.

CampusKey houses 4,000 students in 6 locations in South Africa. It says it will list on th JSE when it gets to 10,000 beds and says this is on track for 2019.

Thanks to research contribution by Enko Capital, which invests in IPOs and other African opportunities.

UK regulator accused of dropping standards to woo $2 trillion listing

Investment institutions are protesting moves by the UK capital markets regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority, to alter listing standards to accommodate a potential $2 trillion listing on the London Stock Exchange. Meanwhile rumours are growing that Saudi Aramco may be dropping its plans for a £1.5bn initial public offer on the New York, London or Tokyo Stock Exchange in addition to the Tadawul (Saudi Stock Exchange).

According to this article in the Financial Times, a trend towards “uber compliance” for listed securities means Aramco is thinking of selling shares to sovereign wealth funds, possibly led by China, as an alternative to a public listing which would have been the world’s largest float.

On 15 October, Aramco said the giant listing is still on: ““All listing venues under review for optimal decision, IPO process is on track for 2018”.

Plans for a giant £1.5bn ($2bn) initial public offering of only 5% of Aramco’s capital are a key part of Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030, which plans to wean the economy off reliance on oil, where it made up 90% of public revenues until 2014. However, in the short term it may signal Saudi intentions to use price-fixing cartel the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to push up oil prices and boost the valuation.

Outgoing LSE CEO Xavier Rolet accompanied British Prime Minister Theresa May for a visit to Aramco in April, while Andrew Bailey, chief executive of the FCA, agreed the regulator had met the potential listing candidate before a consultation on revising the listing standards. Many observers think there is political pressure on FCA and LSE to win the listing from New York and prove that London is still competitive as Brexit uncertainty and economic damage impacts UK.

Consultation on the FCA’s new listing rules closed on Friday 13 October. It would be the world’s largest float.

According to writer Nils Pratley in The Guardian: “Furious fund managers sense a bad case of a regulator planning to lower standards to suit ministers’ short-term desire to persuade Aramco to float in London rather than New York.

“The investors’ objection is straightforward: why on earth would we want to create a ‘premium’ listing category for state-owned companies while not enforcing normal investor protections?

“Under the FCA’s proposal, the likes of Aramco would be allowed to ignore some basic principles. They would not have to get approval from outside shareholders for transactions with the state. They would not have to give independent shareholders a vote on who should serve as independent directors.

“There clearly could be a place for such companies in London, but you would hardly award ‘premium’ status, a label that is meant to indicate the highest governance protections. The regulatory regime would look like a pushover, which may succeed in drumming up some short-term business but could seriously damage London’s status as a good place to invest.”

On 18 October, the world’s biggest wealth fund warned the FCA that the listing changes would be a “step back”, according to an article in City AM. Norges Bank Investmnet Management, part of the Norwegian Central bank which manages assets on behalf of Norway’s $1trn fund, which has $44bn invested in LSE companies, wrote on 13 October to FCA:

“Ultimately, investors expect today’s high standards of shareholder protection to apply to the premium listing category, whether controlled by a sovereign state or private investors. We fear that relaxing these rules would reduce the voice of minority investors and undermine the independence of the board.”

NBIM said the changes would be a “step back” in terms of investor protection, especially for minority shareholders, and would threaten the London Stock Exchange’s standing as a best in class corporate governance framework: “We believe the FCA should consider a more balanced approach that takes into consideration the interests of all stakeholders in the listing environment.” Other protests about relaxing the listing rules have come from a wide range of institutions, including the Institute of Directors and investor group the International Corporate Governance Network which said the plans were “fundamentally flawed” and increased risk. The Investment Association boss Chris Cummings said the change: “could impact on London’s reputation and future as one of the world’s leading financial centres”.

FCA’s Bailey had told Parliament that people would not need to invest in the new listing if they did not like the governance. According to this article , he wrote: “We do not think protections for investors will be weakened. Plainly, absent the new category, sovereign-controlled companies would be unable to choose a premium listing; they would therefore not be bound by any of the premium listing requirements that might otherwise offer additional protection for investors.”

Bailey said some criticism of the proposal left the “incorrect impression that the premium listing is monolithic in form, and therefore, that any issuer included in that category must also be included in the main FTSE UK index”. Financial services advocacy group The CityUK supported the FCA’s “open-minded approach to regulatory change”.

Ashley Hamilton Claxton, corporate governance manager at Royal London Asset Management, said it will be “bad news” for London if the proposals are put in place: “It looks like the FCA is consulting on amending the existing listing rules to accommodate the peculiarities of one company, which is not a very effective strategy for regulating the market as a whole. If the proposals in this consultation document are implemented, it will be bad news for London and will reverse the progress we have made in recent years to uphold strong governance and protect minority shareholders.”

According to the Financial Times: “A market regulator that makes transparent and fair rules, respecting both property rights and investor choice, will attract business in the long run. If, on the other hand, attracting business becomes a short-term goal, and rules are tailored to land big deals, regulation becomes marketing, and the long-term outlook becomes much less attractive.”

Saudi Aramco says its 2018 listing is on track (photo Reuters/Ali Jarekji)

Vodacom Tanzania’s $213m IPO results due 7 August

According to the latest timetable on the website of Vodacom Tanzania, the extended $213 million initial public offer (IPO) of shares closed on 28 July. Shares are due to be allotted, the register delivered to the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) and the offer results announced on Monday, 7 August.

Refunds and CSD receipts will be printed on 14 August and the listing and trading of shares will be on 15 August. The offer had been extended previously, see our June story here , most recently from 10 July.

A total of 560m shares had been offered at TZS850 each, for an offer value of TZS476bn. It is the biggest IPO so far in 2017 on African capital markets.

The IPO follows the Electronic and Postal Communications Act of 2010 (EPOCA) which requires all telecom companies to list, and the June 2016 Finance Act requiring them to list at least 25% on the DSE to boost domestic ownership. According to news reports the law was changed in June (Finance Act 2017) to allow foreigners to participate.

According to a Business Report article, Vodacom spokesperson Byron Kennedy said in July that opening to international investors: “.. is a positive move for the more than 40,000 Tanzanians that have invested in the IPO as it is expected to improve liquidity of the Vodacom Tanzania shares once they are listed.”

Vivek Mathur, the chief operating officer for Vodacom’s international business, said in a prospectus in February that the capital raising and listing were in line with the government’s intention to strengthen the country’s telecommunications sector to play a key role as the engine of economic growth and socio-economic development: “This process also aims to widen financial inclusion among Tanzanians, and to economically empower the people of Tanzania.”

Reuters reports that two other major telecoms operators, Millicom’s subsidiary Tigo and the local business of India’s Bharti Airtel, have also submitted prospectuses to the regulator the Capital Markets Supervisory Authority CMSA and are awaiting approval for their IPOs.

Vodacom Tanzania wrapping up $213m IPO on Dar es Salaam bourse

Some 40,000 Tanzanians subscribed for the TZS476 billion ($213 million) initial public offer (IPO) of Vodacom Tanzania Ltd, part of South Africa’s Vodacom Group. The figure came from company’s MD, Ian Ferrao, quoted in the Citizen newspaper.

It is the largest IPO in the history of the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) and attracted many first-time buyers.

The company says it has 12.4m customers and 31% market share of a telecoms market it estimated was worth $996m. It says TZS2.6 trillion ($1.17bn) is transacted every month by over 7m customers of its M-pesa mobile money solution. It had offered 560m shares (25% of the company) at TZS850 each. The IPO opened on 9 March and was extended for 3 weeks after the closure date of 19 April and ended 11 May. The announcement of results was due on 26 May, and the listing was expected on 12 June 2017 but has not yet been reported. According to news reports, the Capital Markets and Securities Authority (CMSA) is busy with verification, according to Orbit Securities which is Vodacom’s lead advisor.

Mr Simon Juventus, General Manager of Orbit, said the time extension meant more investors could be reached: “This time around we reached many investors unlike the first six weeks … the progress was good.”

The IPO follows the Electronic and Postal Communications Act of 2010 (EPOCA) which requires all telecom companies to list, and the June 2016 Finance Act requiring them to list at least 25% on the DSE to boost domestic ownership, with foreigners barred.

So far only Vodacom is busy with the process. On 1 June, President John Magufuli said that telecoms licences would be revoked if telecom companies did not list on the Dar es Salaam bourse saying they made enough profit to pay the fines of TZS300m and ordered the Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA) to act tough against telcos that do not list.

According to the President, as reported in Daily News: “Listing at the bourse will enhance transparency and enable the Government to collect its fair share of revenues,” He noted that Ethiopia’s state-owned monopoly telephone company has 30m-35m subscribers and made $1.5bn profit. Tanzania Telecommunications Company Ltd (TTCL) has not paid any dividends since shares were sold to foreign investors in 1990s.

Other companies which list are Airtel (Bharti Airtel Ltd of India and Government each offered to sell 12.5% of the shares), Tigo (local subsidiary of Millicom International Cellular SA of Luxembourg) and Maxcom Maxcom Africa (MaxMalipo), which have presented their prospectus to the CMSA. According to Daily News, the Tanzania Communciations Regulatory Authority (TCRA) says there are 86 tele-firms which that s must list. andOthers include TTCL, Halotel Tanzania, Zantel and Smart. Finance Minister Philip Mpango proposed that smaller companies should be exempted from IPOs as he presenting the Finance Bill 2017 to Parliament.

Opening the IPOs to foreigners
Mpango on 22 June told parliamentarians that Government would bring legislation to allow foreign investors to buy shares in telecommunications companies listing on the DSE. According to Bloomberg , after the IPO stalled.

The combined value of expected telco listings would be $1bn, compared to stock exchange capitalization of about $8.4bn. The Daily News reported that the law change would probably be through a 2017/18 Financial Bill to amend EPOCA.
“We want to open up the mandate of companies listing 25% of their shares to allow Tanzanians, Tanzanian companies, Tanzanians in the diaspora, joint ventures between Tanzanians and foreigners, East Africans or companies owned by East Africans, or citizens from other countries.”

The article quotes George Fumbuka, CEO at stockbroker Core Securities: “We are now doing it the way it should’ve been done. I can understand trying to give special treatment for locals, but in the stock market it should be open market.” He said he thought Vodacom was overpriced and an open market would encourage compaies to price IPOs “more competitively”.

George Kalebaila, director for telecoms and Internet of Things in Africa at International Data Corporation, was quoted by The East African newspaper: “Equity markets need time to develop and I think 25 per cent is rather ambitious, as there is limited equity in local hands waiting to be invested. That’s why you see the shareholding structure of a couple of large organisations favour wealthy and politically connected individuals, who have access to capital.” Foreigners will also be able to buy the shares after the IPO

System to track electronic payments

On 1 June President Magufuli launched Electronic Revenue Collection System (e-RCS), which will be operated by Tanzania Revenue Authority (TRA) and Zanzibar Revenue Board (ZRB). The system is designed to track and directly collect Value Added Tax (VAT) and Excise duty on all electronic transactions by communication companies and financial institutions, with the views of enhancing efficiency in the collection of government revenues.

Tanzania Revenue Authority Commissioner General Charles Kichere said only 3 companies – Halotel, Smart and TTCL – have so far joined e-RCS. He said it was an efficient tool for tracking and collecting revenues through electronic payments without human intervention.