Archive for the 'Fast-moving consumer goods FMCG' Category

Botswana supermarket raising $48m in JSE dual-listing

Botswana supermarket chain Choppies Enterprises Limited has launched a roadshow this week to raise $48 million and dual-list on the main board of the JSE Ltd on 27 May. It is offering to sell 117.4m new shares and 160m shares from existing investors.

Choppies was founded in 1986 and now operates 125 stores in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe and employs over 11,000 people. It hopes to expand in Tanzania and Zambia, while Kenya and Namibia have also come up in reports.

The listing will be a secondary inward listing, so far only a few African companies have taken advantage of this opportunity offered by the JSE. The share price will be finalized after a roadshow which began on 11 May and a book-build run by Rand Merchant Bank. The offer should raise about R574m based on the current share price on the Botswana Stock Exchange.

Choppies store (credit Chronicle, Zimbabwe)

Choppies store (credit Chronicle, Zimbabwe)

Mr. Ramachandran Ottapathu, Group CEO said in a press release: “This is a really exciting moment in the life of the company. The listing on the JSE gives us further impetus for our ambitious growth plans. We are on track to have over 200 stores by the end of next year and we will be opening our first stores in Zambia and Tanzania by mid-2015. Choppies is a strong cash-generating business that has traditionally supported our organic growth of new store openings. The listing will allow us to fast-track the continued roll-out of new stores, unlock opportunities in new markets and fund acquisitions where opportunities arise.” Full details of the offer are available at their investor portal.

Media coverage on Reuters, Bloomberg and Business Day highlights the growth but adds that South African retailers Shoprite and Spar Group are also going after middle-income consumers in African markets. Bloomberg says it trades at 24x estimated earnings, compared to 21.4x for Shoprite and quotes Sasfin senior equity analyst Alec Abraham: “If Choppies can raise money at this price-to-earnings ratio, good for them. But it’s a very competitive space and companies are having to really invest to keep their market share.”

According to the company, Choppies has seen superior growth over recent years with a compound annual growth rate of 27% in total revenues from BWP2.4 billion for the year to 30 June 2011 to BWP5.0bn for the year to June 2014. Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) have grown at a CAGR of 19% to BWP352m in 2014, from BWP207m in 2011.

Mr. Ottapathu said: “We continue to establish ourselves in areas where we see great potential with the transition to branded convenience. We have the benefit of many years of experience identifying the right places to start up new stores for our target market. Our differentiated approach of partnering with local operators and sourcing from local suppliers provides us many advantages as we expand into new markets”.

Choppies locates its stores near taxi ranks and bus routes and is not in large shopping centres, Ottapathu told Bloomberg it has not experienced “significant pressure” on sales in South Africa. “We see growth opportunities in the current markets in which we operate and the retail penetration of the markets we are going into is low,” he said.

Private Equity Africa ranks top 10 deals in 2014

Leading website and magazine Private Equity Africa lists the top 10 Africa private equity deals from 2014. They use data from Preqin.

1. Helios Investment Partners – Helios Towers Africa – $630m
This is the second year that Helios Investment Partners took the top slot when it led a consortium to inject $630m of growth capital into telecommunications service provider Helios Towers Africa (HTA) in July. It was US-based private equity investor Providence Equity Partners’ first deal in Africa. The IFC’s African, Latin American and Caribbean Fund also invested for the first time in HTA. Existing investors Quantum Strategic Partners, Albright Capital Management and RIT Capital Partners also backed the tranche. (Helios’ big deal in 2013 was to partner with BTG Pactual and Indorama to bring $1.5bn investment into Nigeria-based oil and gas exploration company, Petrobras Africa.)

2. Emerging Capital Partners leads consortium – IHS – $490m
Emerging Capital Partners (ECP) led the consortium that invested $490m in Nigeria-based telecommunications towers company IHS. The latest 2014 funding round brought in Goldman Sachs was a new investor and the IFC Global Infrastructure Fund and African Infrastructure Investment Managers (AIIM) were also in. IHS is part-owned by Investec Asset Management, the first private equity investor to fund its expansion. Other existing investors are ECP, Wendel, sovereign wealth fund Korea Investment Corporation (KIC) and the Netherlands Development Finance Company (FMO). KIC first backed IHS when it joined Investec and ECP in a $1bn financing round in 2013. Standard Chartered Bank contributed $70m in senior debt specifically set apart to finance expansion into Zambia as part of the capital package

3. Abraaj – Liberty Star – confidential
South Africa’s Liberty Star Consumer Holdings (Libstar) manufacture and distributes food. It sells private-label products to retailers, own-brand products and third-party packaging and ingredients to the food industry. Abraaj acquired a majority stake in the company through a secondary buyout from Metier, Old Mutual Private Equity, Development Partners International and Lereko – which have all exited the company. Libstar management took a minority stake in the buyout. The deal value is confidential.

4. Atlas Merchant Capital – Union Bank of Nigeria – $270m
The investment was channelled through Atlas Mara Co-Nvest, its $325m investment vehicle listed on the London Stock Exchange. Atlas Merchant previously held 9.05% in Union Bank, inherited when it took over ADC African Development Corporation in early 2014. It committed the capital by exercising an option to acquire 20.89% of the financial services company.

5. IFC-Asset Management Compan & Temasek – Seven Energy – $255m
More sovereign wealth fund action in April, when Singapore’s Temasek partners with IFC Asset Management Company (IFC-AMC) to invest $255m in Nigeria’s Seven Energy, an oil and gas exploration and production company. Temasek contributed $150m for a 25% stake. Previous investors in Seven Energy include Actis, Investec Asset Management, Africa Finance Corporation, Capital International Private Equity and Standard Chartered Private Equity. Seven Energy’s $600m capital-raising round included $335m in debt of which the IFC African, Latin American, and Caribbean Fund contributed $30m.

6. Kohlberg Kravis Roberts – Afriflora – $200m
KKR’s first deal for Africa, in July, was approximately $200m in Afriflora, an Ethiopia-focused agriculture production company that cultivates, produces and sells roses based on Fairtrade standards. The company operates as Sher Ethiopia. The investment is part of KKR’s $6.2bn European Fund III.

7. Carlyle – Tiger Automotive – confidential
It was fast-moving Carlyle’s third deal of the year from its maiden $698m Africa-focused fund, closed earlier in 2014. It bought South Africa’s vehicle accessories distributor Tiger Automotive (TiAuto) in November. It partnered with Old Mutual Private Equity (OMPE) to buy the company from Ethos Private Equity. TiAuto operates through 7 divisions, including Tiger Wheel & Tyre, Tyres & More, YSA and Treads Unlimited and primarily distributes branded tyres such as Continental, Yokohama, Michelin, Pirelli, Goodyear, Achilles, GT Radial and Hankook.

8. Stanchart – Sphinx Glass – $180m
Standard Chartered Private Equity backed a deal and partnered with Saudi Arabia’s Construction Products Holding to buy Egypt-based industrial production company Sphinx Glass from Qalaa Holdings (formerly Citadel Capital) in May for $180m. Sphinx Glass operates under license from US-based PPG Industries, a specialist float glass technology provider. Qalaa sold it as part of a strategy to shed non-core assets.

9. Rocket & Kinnevik – Jumia – $148m
Hotshot tech investors Rocket Internet and Kinnevik put another $148m into their consumer shopping platform Jumia in December. US-based private equity investor Summit Partners owns part of Jumia and JP Morgan Asset Management has also previously invested. Jumia owns consumer shopping websites offering branded consumer products as Internet shopping starts to take Africa by storm. Rocket Internet has previously backed Groupon, eBay, Facebook, LinkedIn and Zynga. Watch this space.

10. Carlyle Diamond Bank – $147m
Carlyle’s fourth deal was into Nigeria-based financial services company Diamond Bank, which is a Tier II bank, covering corporate, retail and public sector banking with subsidiaries offering custodian, mortgage, securities and insurance products and services. Kunoch Holdings, the Africa-focused investment platform of entrepreneur and investor Pascal Dozie, raised its holding in the bank from 5.86% to 20.65% in August, buying the additional stake from Actis and CDC Group.

*Rankings based on Preqin data and Private Equity Africa research.

DPI private equity fund raises $400m

A leading African private equity house Development Partners International (www.dpi-llp.com) has reached the first close of its second pan-African African Development Partners II (ADP II) fund at over $400 million. According to authoritative website Private Equity Africa, the fund has raised over $250 million in equity commitments from Limited Partners and $150million in debt from the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC).
Equity LPs in the fund include the CDC Group, which upped its $25m ADP I investment to $75m in the new fund , according to PEA . DPI’s first fund raised approximately $400m.
ADP II fund is structured as a 10-year Guernsey Limited Partnership. Its final close will be at $500m. DPI’ chief executive officer is Runa Alam and its portfolio companies operate in 18 African countries.
Similar to ADP I, the new fund is pursuing a broadly diversified strategy across Africa. The DPI managers have particular interest in finance, healthcare, education, construction, and consumer goods sectors although they can invest generally, reports PEA.
DPI has a track record in the high-growth fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector, including investing in Nigeria’s Food Concepts, which operates consumer food retail outlets under the brands Chicken Republic and Butterfield Bakery; South Africa’s Libstar, a holding company; and in 2013 a deal to back Biopharm, a pharmaceutical company in Algeria.
Financial services investments include Letshego Holdings, a financial services company based in Botswana; Nigeria’ s Mansard Insurance, previously Guaranty Trust Assurance; and Ghana’s CAL Bank. Previously DPI had invested in Touax Africa, which is holding company for leasing firms Ste Auxiliaire de Construction de Montage et d’Industrie (Sacmi) and Réalisations Aménagements Constructions (Ramco), both based in Morocco.
Other investments include pan-African telecommunications tower-sharing services company Eaton Towers and OSEAD, a North-Africa focused mining exploration company.
DPI LLP was founded in 2007 and is based in London. Veteran Africa investor Miles Morland was co-founding partner with Alam and is also chairman of DPI.

Africa’s best real estate developer is private equity group Actis

Leading African private equity group Actis has won the title for “Best Developer in Africa” in the 8th annual global Euromoney Real Estate Survey run by finance magazine Euromoney. To collect data for the award, Euromoney was canvassing the opinions of senior real-estate bankers, developers, investment managers, corporate end-users and advisory firms in over 70 countries since March. It was the biggest Euromoney real estate poll with over 1,900 responses. Actis invests mainly in retail and office developments in high-growth markets such as Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia. It launched its first real estate fund in 2006 and concentrates on institutional quality investments. It is sub-Saharan Africa’s most experienced private equity real estate investor and developer, according to a press release.

Current Actis developments include Ghana’s first green-certified building One Airport Square in Accra; East Africa’s biggest retail centre Garden City in Nairobi, and Ikeja City Mall in Lagos which welcomed 45,000 people on its first day of trading in December 2011. Past investments include Accra Mall in Accra and The Junction in Nairobi.

According to the press release, David Morley, Head of Real Estate at Actis, said: “Sub-Saharan Africa has a population of 800 million people and is the fastest urbanising region in the world; an increasingly sophisticated consumer class seek places to live, eat, shop and relax in the face of chronic undersupply. There is tremendous opportunity for those who take up the challenge and we are very proud to see our work recognised in this way.” Euromoney Editor Clive Horwood said, “The winners of this year’s Euromoney survey are those that exhibited the ability to innovate and make best use of the inherent strengths of their organisation. In Africa, in particular, there are great opportunities for those companies best equipped to operate in challenging markets. Through the Euromoney real estate survey, the market has recognised Actis as the leader in this field.”

Nairobi’s Garden City
In July Actis confirmed its investment in Nairobi’s Garden City, a 32-acre mixed use development on the recently expanded 8-lane Thika Highway. This will be a 50,000 sqm retail mall, with commercial premises, 500 new homes and a 4-acre central park, offering family friendly leisure space for Kenyans and visitors to the city. The park will also house an outdoor events arena for the staging of concerts and shows. Groundbreaking is due in December 2012 and completion targeted for May 2014, according to a press release.

Actis is working with leading retailers, including a flagship store for South Africa’s Game, their first in Kenya. Letting is underway with specialist agents Knight Frank Kenya and Broll in South Africa. There are detailed discussions with other foreign retailers looking to enter the rapidly-expanding Kenyan market, such as South African fashion group, Foschini. There is a strong focus on environmental features and the aim is to achieve the first LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for a retail mall in East Africa. This brings down operating costs for tenants by reducing electricity and water consumption.

Accra Mall sold
In May Actis confirmed that it had sold its 85% shareholding in Ghana’s Accra Mall to South Africa’s commercial and retail property developer Atterbury and financial services group Sanlam. Actis managed the development process, invested the equity and raised the debt to finance the project, working in partnership with renowned Ghanaian entrepreneurs, the Owusu-Akyaw family. The mall opened its doors in July 2008 fully let, and attracts 135,000 shoppers each week, according to a press release.

Accra Mall is Ghana’s first A-grade shopping and leisure centre, home to international brands such as Shoprite and Game, as well as Ghanaian brands including Kiki Clothing and Nallem. The trade sale demonstrates an increasing interest in Ghana by foreign investors and also reflects the acute demand for high quality real estate assets in sub-Saharan Africa.

Actis 100% owned
Also in May, Actis said it had bought the UK Government’s remaining 40% shareholding in the company. In the deal announced on 1 May, the government will receive a cash payment of US$13m (£8m) and will participate in future profits as Actis’s investments are realised over the next decade. To date, Actis has invested £1.7bn on behalf of the UK government’s direct finance institution CDC and has returned £3.1bn to CDC and by extension the British taxpayer.

Paul Fletcher, Senior Partner at Actis, said: “When Actis opened for business in 2004 our purpose was to attract private capital to countries that were dependent on aid and to legitimise them as investment destinations. Over the last eight years our work in Africa, Asia and Latin America, investing in over 70 companies employing 113,000 people, has shown what is possible. Successive governments have shown real vision backing a private sector model like Actis. We are pleased that HMG has realised the value of their decision to support Actis from the start. We look forward to continuing our work, investing in high quality companies in high growth countries and delivering strong returns for our investors.”