Archive for the 'blockchain' Category

Regulated blockchain and commodity exchanges coming to Mauritius

GMEX Group is leading in plans to launch a revolutionary blockchain exchange platform in Mauritius with MINDEX Holdings Limited (MINDEX) linked to Mauritius International Derivatives and Commodities Exchange and Hybrid Stock Exchange Corporation Limited (HYBSE).

The new bourse will be called HYBSE International Marketplace. The partners are:
• MINDEX: a complete exchange, post trade and physical infrastructure, facilitating a variety of asset classes to be traded in Mauritius, supported by GMEX
• GMEX: a world leader in digital business and technology solutions for exchange and post-trade operators. GMEX serves as core of a network of stock exchanges and other trading and post-trade centres around the world.
• HYBSE: a global online marketplace based on blockchain technology that is part of the DIM-Ecosystem.

Daniel Liu of HYBSE and Hirander Misra of GMEX Group

According to the press release:
“The HYBSE International Marketplace will integrate blockchain solutions and technology with traditional financial industries providing a complete and governed ecosystem that digitalizes assets onto the Blockchain. This partnership will for the first time, enable institutional investors access to cryptocurrency ETF’s and other crypto-instruments.
“The following asset classes will be facilitated for trade in a digital tokenized format:
• Cryptonized shares
• Cryptonized currencies
• Commodities
• Indices
• Forex
• ETCs (Exchange-traded commodities)
• ETFs (Exchange-traded funds)
• CETFs (Crypto exchange-traded funds)

“SMEs (small and medium enterprises) will be able to use the HYBSE International Marketplace to seek capital by launching an Initial Blockshare Offering (IBO); a time-limited offer to purchase cryptonized-equities and other cryptonized-instruments, such as blockshares, from businesses registered on the HYBSE International Marketplace at special discounted rates.”

The decision to set up in Mauritius follows news that the regulator FSC will create new licensable activities for the Custodian of Digital Assets and Digital Asset Marketplace – see consultation paper issued in November 2018 – and provide a regulated environment for the exchange and safe custody of digital assets. The regulator in Mauritius has also issued guidelines on investment in cryptocurrency as a digital asset.

Hirander Misra, CEO of GMEX Group, commented: “He added, “We welcome the new regulatory framework for digital assets in Mauritius and we are thrilled to be at the forefront of market development as one of the first ventures to set up under the new regime. We are firmly convinced that there is a massive opportunity for Mauritius to position itself as a major global hub in this dynamic space underpinned by strong governance and regulation to ensure trust”.

In a blog post he noted that Mauritius has also set up a National Regulatory Sandbox Licence Committee to consider sandbox licensing of fintech activities. “Sham ICOs have to be stopped and robust KYC / AML processes and rules must be put in place. In addition technology if developed and deployed well can ensure that some of the crypto exchange hacks we have heard of in other parts of the world can be avoided. Ultimately the current regulatory confusion will correct itself as there will be a flight to quality to those jurisdictions with robust laws and regulations in place. The unregulated bucket shop exchanges with poor controls will cease to exist, as properly run and secure technology enabled digital exchanges and digital asset custodians come into the market to facilitate increased institutional business and wholesale retail business.”

Commodity platform – gold from mine to vault
In June, GMEX had announced it was part of the initial consortium to launch Mauritius International Derivatives and Commodities Exchange (MINDEX), which will become a multi-commodity and derivatives exchange platform. The Mauritius Financial Services Commission will exercise full regulatory oversight.
GMEX has been working closely with the British High Commission Mauritius and Department for International Trade (DIT) Mauritius since it opened a regional headquarters in Mauritius International Financial Centre (IFC) during 2017.

MINDEX Clearing will act as central counterparty clearing house (CCP) to clear all trades.

The GMEX consortium led investment in the MINDEX project amounts to $35 million to build a gold refinery, a secure vault, launch of an advanced technologically enabled spot exchange, derivatives exchange and clearing house. This is expected to create 104 direct jobs over 2 years and an additional 408 new secondary jobs over the next 2 years in Mauritius.

The Department for International Trade’s Minister for Investment Graham Stuart MP said: “As an international economic department, we are pleased to be working with GMEX in Mauritius on an investment which will sustain and create jobs in Mauritius and the UK. The MINDEX project will support an ecosystem which creates opportunities in gold mining, refining, storage, recycling, and in commodities trading and financial technology.

“We will continue support companies’ overseas investments where there is benefit to the UK by offering practical support to investors, facilitating introductions to ease market entry and using our expertise to explain political sensitivities and cultural differences to British businesses.”

Blockchain, crypto and the changes to stock exchanges in coming 2 years

Hirander Misra of GMEX, speaking at panel organized by lawyers Mackrell Turner Garrett on cryptocurrencies in London on 14 Nov, says: “We get 10 inquiries a week to set up a platform. The bar for setting up a blockchain or crypto exchange is moving much higher. In Mauritius and Abu Dhabi the bar is almost as high as for setting up a normal exchange.

“Digital currency is here to stay, in time some sovereign states will adopt it. In Venezuela, where currency collapsed, people have used bitcoin to get currency out, in Harare people have adopted it. Fidelity and others have started to dip their toes in the water.

“Independent crypto exchanges are opaque, it can be very expensive to get assets in and out. In the last 6-12 months, some of the big custodians have been getting involved, the large banks are going into custody, adopting own products, vaults, etc.

“We talk about ‘decentralized’ but everyone is protecting their own turf, we will end up in worse mess. It can be spaghetti.

“Securities exchanges are very much like they were 25 years ago, standalone, at the time when electronic trading came in. Unless you change you won’t be relevant. There will be change in the next 2 years.

“We still need for regulation and intermediaries, people still want institutions to be accountable. A lot of what we have done in last 30 years is still relevant, our challenge is to make it more efficient.”

GMEX
GMEX Group (GMEX) comprises a set of companies that offer leading-edge innovative solutions for a new era of global financial markets, providing business expertise, the latest technology, connectivity, and operational excellence delivered through an aligned partnership driven approach. GMEX uses extensive market infrastructure experience and expertise to create an appropriate strategic master plan with exchanges, clearing houses, depositories, registries, and warehouse receipt platforms. GMEX also offers the added benefit of interconnection to multiple partner exchanges, to create global networks of liquidity. GMEX Technologies is a wholly owned subsidiary of GMEX Group.

Consensys ramps up blockchain rollout in African financial markets with new appointment

Leading #Blockchain innovator #Consensys continues to ramp up its role in shaping the future of financial services and capital markets in Africa with the recruitment of #fintech veteran Ian Bessarabia. He joins the team as Head of South African Operations to support the implementation of enterprise Blockchain solution.
Bessarabia has been working in fintech for 20 years, and has managed operations teams, project implementations and market-driven initiatives in an array of countries and across industry. He is best known in African and global capital markets for his work as Market Development Lead – Fixed Income, Foreign Exchange and Blockchain – Africa at Thomson Reuters and previously as Business Development Manager at SWIFT.

Ian Bessarabia


ConsenSys is a worldwide venture production studio that specialises in building decentralised applications (DApps), enterprise solutions and various developer tools for Blockchain ecosystems, focused primarily on Ethereum. Powered by smart contracts, and secured through encryption, the applications provide the benefits of transparency, auditability, and immutability that are unique to solutions based on blockchain.
In a recent post on LinkedIn Bessarabia wrote: “Blockchain has the power to transform the way businesses share information and deliver services. However, this relatively new technology needs to demonstrate clear value to businesses before it builds enough trust to go mainstream.
In a recent press release Bessarabia adds: “Much time has been spent analysing and challenging the underlying technology, and there is a pressing need to shift the thinking into a tangible business narrative, and pragmatic adoption. Expansion within the local financial sector will see our marketplace becoming Blockchain enabled. The idea is that every asset bought or sold would be on the ledger”.

Monica Singer

Monica Singer, South Africa Lead at ConsenSys, recruited him: “It provides me tremendous pleasure to take someone with the abilities and experience as Ian on board. We are on such an incredibly exciting journey and having Ian provide his input is a real boon for us.”
According to the press release: “(Ian) thrives on mentoring start-ups and early-stage initiatives looking at deploying technology for social good. As an ethical protagonist, he is also a participant of the Ethics and Governance Think Tank, run by The University of Pretoria’s Gordon Institute of Business Science” He is on the South African Financial Blockchain Consortium (SAFBC), a group aimed at educating and bringing the benefits of Blockchain to the industry for the benefit of the entire country.

What is Ethereum?
According to the Ethereum website it’s a way to build “unstoppable applications”:
“Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud or third-party interference.
“These apps run on a custom built blockchain, an enormously powerful shared global infrastructure that can move value around and represent the ownership of property.
“This enables developers to create markets, store registries of debts or promises, move funds in accordance with instructions given long in the past (like a will or a futures contract) and many other things that have not been invented yet, all without a middleman or counterparty risk.”

Barclays Bank call for standards for derivative trades on blockchain

Blockchain can revolutionize trading in derivatives, fix inefficiencies and cut cost of trading, but only if there is much more standardization across the industry. Barclays Bank is one of the key champions and yesterday (26 April) spoke out at the annual meeting of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) in Miami, USA.

According to this preview article on Coindesk: “Before banks and traders can rely on a distributed ledger technology as the vaunted ‘single record of truth,’ there first needs to be better standardization. Yet as it stands, they use a hodgepodge of data structures and formats to track the life cycle of trades, reflecting in part the variety of regulatory requirements imposed after the 2008 financial crisis.”

ISDA had proposed a common domain model (CDM) in May 2017, with the support of blockchain firms including R3, a consortium of the world’s biggest banks including JPMorgan and Citigroup among 200 enterprises, dedicated to researching and delivering new financial technology, and Axoni, a capital markets technology firm specializing in distributed ledger infrastructure.

ISDA is to release the first iteration of the blockchain-compatible version of CDM in early summer 2018 and Barclays has an internal CDM adoption working group. Coindesk quotes Sunil Challa from the business architect team at Barclays: “There is a shiny new technology promising to be a panacea for fixing many post-trade processing issues. So, now is an opportune moment to re-engineer our processes.”

“Simply replicating the existing fragmented state would be a colossal missed opportunity.”

How blockchain works for derivatives
Derivatives are traded using a contract between two or more parties, as highlighted in April 2016 on CNBC. Derivatives “contracts are made up of three main parts with ISDA creating the standards for derivative trading across the financial world. But the process is arduous with current paper contracts in the form of computer documents still being issued.”

Barclays showcased a prototype of using smart contracts through the lifecycle of a derivatives trade, including negotiating an ISDA master agreement, entering individual trades and performing the trades on a distributed ledger. The bank replaced traditional derivatives contracts with an electronic smart contract, whose fields could be pre-populated with certain values agreed by ISDA. This way, all the banks have the same document which will not vary slightly from bank to bank, something that can cause delays and unnecessary human intervention. The UK bank used a blockchain called Corda, developed by R3.

The banks involved could then populate the fields with the terms of the derivatives agreement such as the price with any changes being recorded. Those can then be seen online. Previously, a bank would have to search through its inbox or pile of documents to find an earlier version of the draft.

Even if banks use CDM on transactions between them, often they use their own ways to communicate data internally. CDM and distributed ledger could standardize data within institutions. It also provides a way for derivatives trading to be “blockchain agnostic” as many different providers are providing blockchain platforms and it is seen as risky to be on one.

Coindesk quotes Lee Braine of Barclays CTO Office, describing a future scenario in which banks are trading with each other on different distributed ledgers. If there are some counterparties on one network and other counterparties on other networks, would each need to host a node on every network or could they be genuinely interoperable? “A simplistic solution would be to revert to the traditional model of silos with messaging between them, but that risks replicating the fragmentation of the past. If you instead transition to the CDM, then at least there is opportunity to standardize on data structures, lifecycle events etc.”

Better for costs, better for regulators
Barclays working group estimated around 25% gains in efficiency form using CDM only in clearing, and about $2.5 billion in annual running costs.

Goldman Sachs, another keen supporter of CDM and shared ledgers as a way to deal with some of the extra pressures from implementing the European Union MiFID2 Markets in Financial Instruments Directive, which started being rolled out across financial institutions in the EU in January 2018.

One appeal for blockchain is that regulators can streamline reporting, by pulling data from a node on the blockchain. The Financial Conduct Authority of UK participated in a proof-of-concept for regulatory reporting of data mortgage transactions, using R3’s Corda platform.

According to Coindesk, Clive Ansell, head of market infrastructure and technology at ISDA, says: “There is a fantastic opportunity … but the level of success will depend on the industry operating to a common data and processing model.”

This article also appears at my new company website, www.innovation-wire.com.