SEC Nigeria leads FSD Africa programme to boost capital markets regulators

Left to right: Reginald Karawusa (Director, Legal and Enforcement, SEC), Laure Beufils (Deputy High Commissioner), Mary Uduk (ag Director General, SEC), Evans Osano (Director Financial Markets, FSD Africa), Richard Sandall (Senior Advisor, DFID Nigeria).

Funding organization FSD Africa is launching a 3-year programme to improve skills of Africa’s capital market regulators. The Securities and Exchange Commission SEC Nigeria is the first capital-market regulator after signing an agreement worth £450,000 ($585,200) on 28 September.
The programme will also be rolled out in Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. FSD Africa is a non-profit funded by UK Aid, which is Department for International Development (DFID) and the British Government.
FSD Africa will provide funding over 3 years to build the capacity of regulators, providing technical assistance, encouraging closer collaboration among regulators and conducting research to support the development of new policies and regulations.
Evans Osano, Director Financial Markets at FSD Africa, says (emailed press release): “This partnership will unlock capital by improving investor and issuer confidence, reducing transaction costs and reducing the complexity and approval times for capital issuance. The programme will also support greater collaboration and knowledge sharing with other African capital market regulators.”
FSDA Director Mark Napier says: “Well-functioning capital markets can play a vital role in support of inclusive economic growth by channelling long term finance into infrastructure and other large-scale projects that create jobs and improve access to markets. Strengthening regulatory capacity in capital markets is an essential pre-condition for building investor confidence.”
Mary Uduk, Acting Director General of SEC Nigeria, says the collaboration will facilitate access to capital for private and public issuers and enhance the competitiveness of the Nigerian capital market as a global investment destination. SEC Nigeria is contributing £22,000.
According to a report in the local news Independent the project will promote regulation of financial technology; fund an audit of institutional capacity and implementing the recommendations; and back collaboration and knowledge sharing between regulators.
Laure Beaufils, Deputy High Commissioner, British Deputy High Commission Lagos, commenting on the programme, added that capital markets have an essential role to play to help unlock capital that can be invested in the real economy and that can contribute to job creation and inclusive growth.

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